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Pre-natal exposures and breast tissue composition: findings from a British pre-birth cohort of young women and a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, October 2016
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2 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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12 Dimensions

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61 Mendeley
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Title
Pre-natal exposures and breast tissue composition: findings from a British pre-birth cohort of young women and a systematic review
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13058-016-0751-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel Denholm, Bianca De Stavola, John H. Hipwell, Simon J. Doran, Marta C. Busana, Amanda Eng, Mona Jeffreys, Martin O. Leach, David Hawkes, Isabel dos Santos Silva

Abstract

Breast density, the amount of fibroglandular tissue in the adult breast for a women's age and body mass index, is a strong biomarker of susceptibility to breast cancer, which may, like breast cancer risk itself, be influenced by events early in life. In the present study, we investigated the association between pre-natal exposures and breast tissue composition. A sample of 500 young, nulliparous women (aged approximately 21 years) from a U.K. pre-birth cohort underwent a magnetic resonance imaging examination of their breasts to estimate percent water, a measure of the relative amount of fibroglandular tissue equivalent to mammographic percent density. Information on pre-natal exposures was collected throughout the mothers' pregnancy and shortly after delivery. Regression models were used to investigate associations between percent water and pre-natal exposures. Mediation analysis, and a systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature, were also conducted. Adjusted percent water in young women was positively associated with maternal height (p for linear trend [p t] = 0.005), maternal mammographic density in middle age (p t = 0.018) and the participant's birth size (p t < 0.001 for birthweight). A 1-SD increment in weight (473 g), length (2.3 cm), head circumference (1.2 cm) and Ponderal Index (4.1 g/cm(3)) at birth were associated with 3 % (95 % CI 2-5 %), 2 % (95 % CI 0-3 %), 3 % (95 % CI 1-4 %) and 1 % (95 % CI 0-3 %), respectively, increases in mean adjusted percent water. The effect of maternal height on the participants' percent water was partly mediated through birth size, but there was little evidence that the effect of birthweight was primarily mediated via adult body size. The meta-analysis supported the study findings, with breast density being positively associated with birth size. These findings provide strong evidence of pre-natal influences on breast tissue composition. The positive association between birth size and relative amount of fibroglandular tissue indicates that breast density and breast cancer risk may share a common pre-natal origin.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 15%
Researcher 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 14 23%
Unknown 20 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 13%
Physics and Astronomy 2 3%
Psychology 2 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 25 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2016.
All research outputs
#4,409,481
of 8,650,672 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#636
of 1,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,586
of 251,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#16
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,650,672 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,060 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,856 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.