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The promise and the reality: a mental health workforce perspective on technology-enhanced youth mental health service delivery

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
111 Mendeley
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Title
The promise and the reality: a mental health workforce perspective on technology-enhanced youth mental health service delivery
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1790-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simone Orlowski, Sharon Lawn, Ben Matthews, Anthony Venning, Kaisha Wyld, Gabrielle Jones, Megan Winsall, Gaston Antezana, Geoffrey Schrader, Niranjan Bidargaddi

Abstract

Digital technologies show promise for reversing poor engagement of youth (16-24 years) with mental health services. In particular, mobile and internet based applications with communication capabilities can augment face-to-face mental health service provision. The literature in this field, however, fails to adequately capture the perspectives of the youth mental health workforce regarding utility and acceptability of technology for this purpose. This paper describes results of in-depth qualitative data drawn from various stakeholders involved in provision of youth mental health services in one Australian rural region. Data were obtained using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with regional youth mental health clinicians, youth workers and support/management staff (n = 4 focus groups; n = 8 interviews) and analysed via inductive thematic analysis. Results question the acceptability of technology to engage clients within youth mental health services. Six main themes were identified: young people in a digital age, personal connection, power and vulnerability, professional identity, individual factors and organisational legitimacy. These findings deepen the understanding of risks and challenges faced when adopting new technologies in mental healthcare. Recommendations for technology design and implementation in mental health services are made.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 109 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 23 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 18 16%
Social Sciences 16 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 10%
Computer Science 7 6%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 33 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,950,404
of 8,554,039 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,783
of 3,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,166
of 250,937 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#85
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,554,039 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,163 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,937 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.