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Ethnoveterinary medicines used for horses in Trinidad and in British Columbia, Canada

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, August 2006
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Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

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131 Mendeley
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Title
Ethnoveterinary medicines used for horses in Trinidad and in British Columbia, Canada
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, August 2006
DOI 10.1186/1746-4269-2-31
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cheryl Lans, Nancy Turner, Gerhard Brauer, Grant Lourenco, Karla Georges

Abstract

This paper investigates the commonalities in ethnoveterinary medicine used for horses between Trinidad (West Indies) and British Columbia (Canada). These research areas are part of a common market in pharmaceuticals and are both involved in the North American racing circuit. There has been very little research conducted on medicinal plants used for horses although their use is widespread. The data on ethnoveterinary medicines used for horses was obtained through key informant interviews with horse owners, trainers, breeders, jockeys, grooms and animal care specialists in two research areas: Trinidad and British Columbia (BC). A participatory validation workshop was held in BC. An extensive literature review and botanical identification of the plants was also done. In all, 20 plants were found to be used in treating racehorses in Trinidad and 97 in BC. Of these the most-evidently effective plants 19 of the plants used in Trinidad and 66 of those used in BC are described and evaluated in this paper. Aloe vera, Curcuma longa and Ricinus communis are used in both research areas. More research is needed in Trinidad to identify plants that respondents claimed were used in the past. Far more studies have been conducted on the temperate and Chinese medicinal plants used in BC and therefore these ethnoveterinary remedies reflect stronger evidence of efficacy.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 131 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 2 2%
Czechia 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 123 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 18%
Researcher 21 16%
Student > Bachelor 19 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 10%
Other 10 8%
Other 26 20%
Unknown 18 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 9 7%
Environmental Science 8 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 5%
Other 28 21%
Unknown 24 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2013.
All research outputs
#2,015,734
of 3,634,360 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#184
of 306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,340
of 85,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#12
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,634,360 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 306 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 85,587 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.