↓ Skip to main content

Prevalence, care-seeking, and health service utilization for non-communicable diseases among Syrian refugees and host communities in Lebanon

Overview of attention for article published in Conflict and Health, October 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Prevalence, care-seeking, and health service utilization for non-communicable diseases among Syrian refugees and host communities in Lebanon
Published in
Conflict and Health, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13031-016-0088-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shannon Doocy, Emily Lyles, Baptiste Hanquart, Michael Woodman

Abstract

Given the large burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) among both Syrian refugees and the host communities within which they are settled, humanitarian actors and the government of Lebanon face immense challenges in addressing health needs. This study assessed health status, unmet needs, and utilization of health services among Syrian refugees and host communities in Lebanon. A cross-sectional survey of Syrian refugees and host communities in Lebanon was conducted using a two-stage cluster survey design with probability proportional to size sampling. To obtain information on chronic NCDs, respondents were asked a series of questions about hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, and arthritis. Differences in household characteristics by care-seeking for these conditions were examined using chi-square, t-test, and adjusted logistic regression methods. Over half (50.4 %) of refugee and host community households (60.2 %) reported a member with one of the five NCDs. Host community prevalence rates were significantly higher than refugees for all conditions except chronic respiratory diseases (p = 0.08). Care-seeking for NCDs among refugees and host community households was high across all conditions with 82.9 and 97.8 %, respectively, having sought care in Lebanon for their condition. Refugees utilized primary health care centers (PHCC) (57.7 %) most often while host communities sought care most in private clinics (62.4 %). Overall, 69.7 % of refugees and 82.7 % of host community members reported an out-of-pocket consultation payment (p = 0.041) with an average payment of US$15 among refugees and US$42 for the host community (p <0.001). Given the protracted nature of the Syrian crisis and the burden on the Lebanese health system, implications for both individuals with NCDs and Lebanon's health system are immense. The burden of out of pocket expenses on persons with NCDs are also substantial, especially given the tenuous economic status of many refugees and the less affluent segments of the Lebanese population. Greater investment in the public sector health system could benefit all parties. Efforts to improve quality of care for NCDs at the primary care level are also a critical component of preventing adverse outcomes and lowering the overall cost of care for NCDs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 25%
Other 8 15%
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 5%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 15 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 11%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 7%
Engineering 4 7%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 18 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2016.
All research outputs
#3,474,962
of 19,918,818 outputs
Outputs from Conflict and Health
#321
of 510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,697
of 312,288 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Conflict and Health
#19
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,918,818 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 510 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 312,288 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.