↓ Skip to main content

Dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk: a meta-analysis of 11 population-based cohort studies

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, October 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 1,438)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
354 tweeters
facebook
12 Facebook pages
video
8 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
215 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk: a meta-analysis of 11 population-based cohort studies
Published in
Nutrition Journal, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12937-016-0210-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wei Lu, Hanwen Chen, Yuequn Niu, Han Wu, Dajing Xia, Yihua Wu

Abstract

Dairy products are major components of daily diet and the association between consumption of dairy products and public health issues has captured great attention. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk. After a literature search in PubMed and EMBASE, 11 population-based cohort studies involving 778,929 individuals were considered eligible and included in the analyses. Data were extracted and the association between dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk was estimated by calculating pooled relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses based on regions, genders and dairy types were performed as well. Potential dose-response relationship was further explored by adopting the generalized least squares (GLST) method. Total dairy products intake was not associated with all cancer mortality risk, with the pooled RR of 0.99 (95 % CI 0.92-1.07, p = 0.893). Subgroup analyses showed that the pooled RRs were 0.97 (95 % CI 0.92-1.03, p = 0.314) for milk, 0.88 (95 % CI 0.71-1.10, p = 0.271) for yogurt, 1.23 (95 % CI 0.94-1.61, p = 0.127) for cheese and 1.13 (95 % CI 0.89-1.44, p = 0.317) for butter in male and female, however the pooled RR was 1.50 (95 % CI 1.03-2.17, p = 0.032) for whole milk in male, which was limited to prostate cancer. Further dose-response analyses were performed and we found that increase of whole milk (serving/day) induced elevated prostate cancer mortality risk significantly, with the RR of 1.43 (95 % CI 1.13-1.81, p = 0.003). Total dairy products intake have no significant impact on increased all cancer mortality risk, while low total dairy intake even reduced relative risk based on the non-linear model. However, whole milk intake in men contributed to elevated prostate cancer mortality risk significantly. Furthermore, a linear dose-response relationship existed between increase of whole milk intake and increase of prostate cancer mortality risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 354 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 215 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 213 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 52 24%
Student > Bachelor 37 17%
Other 19 9%
Researcher 14 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 6%
Other 39 18%
Unknown 42 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 51 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 41 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 7%
Sports and Recreations 6 3%
Other 25 12%
Unknown 58 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 257. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2023.
All research outputs
#119,415
of 23,002,898 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#48
of 1,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,730
of 316,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,002,898 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,915 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.