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A pilot study to assess use of fluorescent lotion in patient care simulations to illustrate pathogen dissemination and train personnel in correct use of personal protective equipment

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
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Title
A pilot study to assess use of fluorescent lotion in patient care simulations to illustrate pathogen dissemination and train personnel in correct use of personal protective equipment
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13756-016-0141-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heba Alhmidi, Sreelatha Koganti, Myreen E. Tomas, Jennifer L. Cadnum, Annette Jencson, Curtis J. Donskey

Abstract

Simulations using fluorescent tracers can be useful in understanding the spread of pathogens and in devising effective infection control strategies. During simulated patient care interactions in which providers wore gloves and gowns, we evaluated environmental and personnel dissemination of fluorescent lotion and bacteriophage MS2 from a contaminated mannequin. The frequency of skin and clothing contamination after removal of personal protective equipment (PPE) was compared before versus after an intervention that included education and practice in PPE donning and doffing. Ten healthcare personnel participated in 30 pre-intervention and 30 post-intervention patient care simulations. Fluorescent lotion and bacteriophage MS2 were rapidly disseminated to touched surfaces throughout the room; there was no difference in the frequency of contamination before versus after the PPE training intervention. After the intervention, there was a decrease in skin and/or clothing contamination with fluorescent lotion (9/30, 30 % versus 1/30, 3 %; P = 0.01) and bacteriophage MS2 (8/30, 27 % versus 2/30, 7 %; P = 0.08) and there was a significant reduction in the concentration of bacteriophage MS2 recovered from hands (0.31 versus 0.07 log10plaque-forming units; P < 0.01). Our findings suggest that simulations with fluorescent lotion can be a useful teaching tool to illustrate the spread of pathogens and provide further evidence that simple PPE training interventions can be effective in reducing contamination of personnel.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 25 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 31%
Other 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 7 27%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 23%
Environmental Science 4 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 12%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 8%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,001,803
of 12,019,430 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#153
of 500 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,697
of 259,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#10
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,019,430 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 500 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,295 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.