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“Sometimes I feel like a pharmacist”: identity and medication use among adolescents with juvenile arthritis

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Rheumatology, October 2016
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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61 Mendeley
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Title
“Sometimes I feel like a pharmacist”: identity and medication use among adolescents with juvenile arthritis
Published in
Pediatric Rheumatology, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12969-016-0117-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. E. McDonagh, K. L. Shaw, J. Prescott, F. J. Smith, R. Roberts, N. J. Gray

Abstract

Taking medicines as intended is difficult for everybody, but young people going through adolescence have greater problems than adults and younger children. One of the most important things that happen during the teenage years is the development of individual identities, which might not remain constant during this time and can be affected deeply by the diagnosis of a long-term condition. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between identity and medication use among young people with juvenile arthritis. A prospective qualitative study was undertaken to collect private online 'blog' style data from young people (aged 11-19 years) with juvenile arthritis, and their parents, to examine their views about their condition, identity, medication and use of health services. Participants were identified from a large paediatric hospital in the UK. Young people (n = 21) with a median age 14 years (range 11-17 years) posted a median (range) of 8 (1-36) blogs and parents (n = 6) posted 4 (1-12) blogs. Young people gave a strong sense of both private and public identity that was intertwined with their arthritis and treatment. It was evident that young people's self-care was intrinsically linked to their attempts to maintain a sense of individually and socially constructed definitions of normality. The act of taking medication, and the consequences (positive or negative) of that act, had an impact both personally and socially. Young people with juvenile arthritis reflect on their medication as a factor affecting their perception of themselves. Acknowledging the roles of both personal and social identity will be important in any strategies to support optimal medication use. This includes an understanding of the identity transformations that young people can experience and how decision-making may be affected by their attempts to retain pre-diagnosis identities and/or develop new social identities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 59 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 18%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Master 7 11%
Other 5 8%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 16 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 13%
Psychology 7 11%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 23 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2020.
All research outputs
#12,071,527
of 19,659,155 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Rheumatology
#347
of 616 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,584
of 311,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Rheumatology
#27
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,659,155 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 616 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,422 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.