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Energy state affects exploratory behavior of tree sparrows in a group context under differential food-patch distributions

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, October 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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3 tweeters

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Energy state affects exploratory behavior of tree sparrows in a group context under differential food-patch distributions
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12983-016-0180-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ya-Fu Lee, Yen-Min Kuo, Wen-Chen Chu

Abstract

When facing a novel situation, animals can retreat or leave to avoid risks, but will miss potential resources and opportunities. Alternatively they may reduce environmental uncertainty by exploration, while risking no energy rewards and exposure to hazards, and use the information retrieved for subsequent decision making. When exploring, however, animals may adopt different tactics according to individual states. We tested that energy states will affect exploratory behavior by experimenting with wild-caught untrained Eurasian tree sparrows (Passer montanus) in fasted or fed states exploring in a novel space with hidden food supply in different patch distribution patterns. Our data revealed that fasted sparrows risked being earlier explorers more often, initiated more exploratory bouts before patches were found, and stayed longer on the ground under both patch patterns. Fasted sparrows discovered more patches and consumed more food than fed sparrows in dispersed, but not necessary so in clumped, patch patterns; whereas fed birds also increased patch finding to a certain level in dispersed patterns. Sparrows of both energy states, however, did not differ in feeding rates in either patch pattern. Exploratory behavior of tree sparrows is state-dependent, which supports our prediction that birds with an energy shortage will be risk-prone and explore more readily. Our study also indicates a game nature of tree sparrow exploratory behavior in a group context when explorers are in different energy states and are exposed to different patch distributions. Birds of lower energy state adopting an active exploring tactic may be favored by obtaining higher energy gains in dispersed patch patterns with lower patch richness. More satiated birds, however, achieved a similar feeding rate by lowered exposure time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 24%
Student > Master 5 20%
Researcher 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 8 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 44%
Neuroscience 3 12%
Psychology 1 4%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Unknown 9 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2016.
All research outputs
#4,922,700
of 10,181,331 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#260
of 418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,524
of 254,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#6
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,181,331 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,650 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.