↓ Skip to main content

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part I

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), November 2010
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 1,234)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
53 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
142 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
692 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part I
Published in
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), November 2010
DOI 10.1186/1532-429x-12-71
Pubmed ID
Authors

John P Ridgway

Abstract

There are many excellent specialised texts and articles that describe the physical principles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques. There are also many texts written with the clinician in mind that provide an understandable, more general introduction to the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and applications. There are however very few texts or articles that attempt to provide a basic MR physics introduction that is tailored for clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. This is the first of two reviews that are intended to cover the essential aspects of CMR physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to this group. It begins by explaining the basic physical principles of MR, including a description of the main components of an MR imaging system and the three types of magnetic field that they generate. The origin and method of production of the MR signal in biological systems are explained, focusing in particular on the two tissue magnetisation relaxation properties (T1 and T2) that give rise to signal differences from tissues, showing how they can be exploited to generate image contrast for tissue characterisation. The method most commonly used to localise and encode MR signal echoes to form a cross sectional image is described, introducing the concept of k-space and showing how the MR signal data stored within it relates to properties within the reconstructed image. Before describing the CMR acquisition methods in detail, the basic spin echo and gradient pulse sequences are introduced, identifying the key parameters that influence image contrast, including appearances in the presence of flowing blood, resolution and image acquisition time. The main derivatives of these two pulse sequences used for cardiac imaging are then described in more detail. Two of the key requirements for CMR are the need for data acquisition first to be to be synchronised with the subject's ECG and to be fast enough for the subject to be able to hold their breath. Methods of ECG synchronisation using both triggering and retrospective gating approaches, and accelerated data acquisition using turbo or fast spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences are therefore outlined in some detail. It is shown how double inversion black blood preparation combined with turbo or fast spin echo pulse sequences acquisition is used to achieve high quality anatomical imaging. For functional cardiac imaging using cine gradient echo pulse sequences two derivatives of the gradient echo pulse sequence; spoiled gradient echo and balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) are compared. In each case key relevant imaging parameters and vendor-specific terms are defined and explained.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 692 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
Germany 5 <1%
Canada 3 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 659 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 125 18%
Researcher 101 15%
Student > Master 79 11%
Other 71 10%
Student > Bachelor 67 10%
Other 147 21%
Unknown 102 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 326 47%
Engineering 72 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 5%
Physics and Astronomy 29 4%
Computer Science 20 3%
Other 71 10%
Unknown 141 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2021.
All research outputs
#901,583
of 21,612,640 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#22
of 1,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,487
of 172,518 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,612,640 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,234 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 172,518 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them