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Does a shift in host plants trigger speciation in the Alpine leaf beetle Oreina speciosissima(Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Does a shift in host plants trigger speciation in the Alpine leaf beetle Oreina speciosissima(Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)?
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2011
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-11-310
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthias Borer, Tom van Noort, Nils Arrigo, Sven Buerki, Nadir Alvarez

Abstract

Within the Coleoptera, the largest order in the animal kingdom, the exclusively herbivorous Chrysomelidae are recognized as one of the most species rich beetle families. The evolutionary processes that have fueled radiation into the more than thirty-five thousand currently recognized leaf beetle species remain partly unresolved. The prominent role of leaf beetles in the insect world, their omnipresence across all terrestrial biomes and their economic importance as common agricultural pest organisms make this family particularly interesting for studying the mechanisms that drive diversification. Here we specifically focus on two ecotypes of the alpine leaf beetle Oreina speciosissima (Scop.), which have been shown to exhibit morphological differences in male genitalia roughly corresponding to the subspecies Oreina speciosissima sensu stricto and Oreina speciosissima troglodytes. In general the two ecotypes segregate along an elevation gradient and by host plants: Oreina speciosissima sensu stricto colonizes high forb vegetation at low altitude and Oreina speciosissima troglodytes is found in stone run vegetation at higher elevations. Both host plants and leaf beetles have a patchy geographical distribution. Through use of gene sequencing and genome fingerprinting (AFLP) we analyzed the genetic structure and habitat use of Oreina speciosissima populations from the Swiss Alps to examine whether the two ecotypes have a genetic basis. By investigating a wide range of altitudes and focusing on the structuring effect of habitat types, we aim to provide answers regarding the factors that drive adaptive radiation in this phytophagous leaf beetle.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Spain 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Poland 1 2%
Unknown 46 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 37%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Master 6 12%
Professor 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 3 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 67%
Environmental Science 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2013.
All research outputs
#563,773
of 3,684,317 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#308
of 1,200 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,005
of 85,930 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#11
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,684,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,200 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 85,930 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.