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Parental involvement and association with adolescents’ fruit and vegetable intake at follow-up: Process evaluation results from the multi-component school-based Boost intervention

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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114 Mendeley
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Title
Parental involvement and association with adolescents’ fruit and vegetable intake at follow-up: Process evaluation results from the multi-component school-based Boost intervention
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0435-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sanne Ellegård Jørgensen, Thea Suldrup Jørgensen, Anne Kristine Aarestrup, Pernille Due, Rikke Krølner

Abstract

Based on the assumption of parental influence on adolescent behavior, multicomponent school-based dietary interventions often include a parental component. The effect of this intervention component is seldom reported and the evidence is inconsistent. We conducted a systematic process evaluation of the parental component and examined whether the leveal of parental involvement in a large multi-component intervention: the Boost study was associated with adolescents' fruit and vegetable (FV) intake at follow-up. The Boost study was targeting FV intake among 1,175 Danish 7(th) graders (≈13- year-olds) in the school year 2010/11. The study included a school component: free FV in class and curricular activities; a local community component: fact sheets for sports- and youth clubs; and a parental component: presentation of Boost at a parent-school meeting, 6 newsletters to parents, 3 guided student-parent curricular activities, and a student-parent Boost event. Students whose parent replied to the follow-up survey (n = 347). Questionnaire data from students, parents and teachers at 20 intervention schools. Process evaluation measures: dose delivered, dose received, appreciation and level of parental involvement. Parental involvement was trichotomized into: low/no (0-2 points), medium (3 points) and high (4-6 points). The association between level of parental involvement and self-reported FV intake (24-h recall), was analyzed using multilevel regression analyses. The Boost study was presented at a parent-school meeting at all intervention schools. The dose delivered was low to moderate for the three other parental elements. Most parents appreciated the intervention and talked with their child about Boost (83.5 %). High, medium and low parental involvement was found among 30.5 %, 29.6 % and 39.4 % of the students respectively. Parental involvement was highest among women. More men agreed that the parental newsletters provided new information. Students with a medium and high level of parental involvement ate 47.5 and 95.2 g more FV per day compared to students with low level/no parental involvement (p = 0.02). Students with a high level of parental involvement ate significantly more FV at follow-up compared to students with a low level/no parental involvement. Parental involvement in interventions may improve adolescents' FV intake if challenges of implementation can be overcome. ISRCTN11666034 . Registered 06/01/2012. Retrospectively registered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 113 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 20%
Researcher 16 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 13%
Student > Bachelor 13 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 4%
Other 18 16%
Unknown 24 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 16%
Psychology 18 16%
Social Sciences 9 8%
Sports and Recreations 6 5%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 26 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2017.
All research outputs
#2,742,325
of 17,873,421 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#972
of 1,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,690
of 302,543 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#71
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,873,421 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,681 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.7. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,543 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.