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Australian black field crickets show changes in neural gene expression associated with socially-induced morphological, life-history, and behavioral plasticity

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, October 2016
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Title
Australian black field crickets show changes in neural gene expression associated with socially-induced morphological, life-history, and behavioral plasticity
Published in
BMC Genomics, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-3119-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael M. Kasumovic, Zhiliang Chen, Marc R. Wilkins

Abstract

Ecological and evolutionary model organisms have provided extensive insight into the ecological triggers, adaptive benefits, and evolution of life-history driven developmental plasticity. Despite this, we still have a poor understanding of the underlying genetic changes that occur during shifts towards different developmental trajectories. The goal of this study is to determine whether we can identify underlying gene expression patterns that can describe the different life-history trajectories individuals follow in response to social cues of competition. To do this, we use the Australian black field cricket (Teleogryllus commodus), a species with sex-specific developmental trajectories moderated by the density and quality of calls heard during immaturity. In this study, we manipulated the social information males and females could hear by rearing individuals in either calling or silent treatments. We next used RNA-Seq to develop a reference transcriptome to study changes in brain gene expression at two points prior to sexual maturation. We show accelerated development in both sexes when exposed to calling; changes were also seen in growth, lifespan, and reproductive effort. Functional relationships between genes and phenotypes were apparent from ontological enrichment analysis. We demonstrate that increased investment towards traits such as growth and reproductive effort were often associated with the expression of a greater number of genes with similar effect, thus providing a suite of candidate genes for future research in this and other invertebrate organisms. Our results provide interesting insight into the genomic underpinnings of developmental plasticity and highlight the potential of a genomic exploration of other evolutionary theories such as condition dependence and sex-specific developmental strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 19%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Neuroscience 2 8%
Engineering 2 8%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 7 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2016.
All research outputs
#7,405,198
of 8,569,826 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#5,311
of 6,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,770
of 249,507 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#169
of 227 outputs
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