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Self-resilience as a protective factor against development of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in police officers

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, October 2016
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Title
Self-resilience as a protective factor against development of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in police officers
Published in
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40557-016-0145-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jong-Ku Lee, Hyeon-Gyeong Choi, Jae-Yeop Kim, Juhyun Nam, Hee-Tae Kang, Sang-Baek Koh, Sung-Soo Oh

Abstract

This study was conducted to check whether self-resilience, one of the characteristics known to affect the occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms after experiencing traumatic events, could serve as a protective factor for police officers whose occupational factors are corrected. We conducted a cross-sectional study in which 112 male police officers in Gangwon Province participated. They visited the Wonju Severance Christian Hospital Occupational Environment Center for medical check-ups from June to December 2015. Their general characteristics were identified using structured questionnaires, and they were asked to fill in the Korean Occupational Stress Scale-Short Form (KOSS-SF). Further, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale-Korean (CD-RI-K), and Impact of Event Scale-Revised-Korean version (IES-R-K) were used to evaluate their job stress, depression, self-resilience, and PTSD symptoms. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to correct their personal, occupational, and psychological factors to analyze the relationship between self-resilience and PTSD symptoms. Among 112 respondents who experienced a traumatic event, those with low self-resilience had significantly higher rate of PTSD symptoms than those with high self-resilience even after correcting for the covariate of general, occupational, and psychological characteristics (odds ratio [OR] 3.51; 95 % CI: 1.06-19.23). Despite several limitations, these results suggest that a high degree of self-resilience may protect police officers from critical incident-related PTSD symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 104 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Researcher 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 24 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 41 39%
Social Sciences 14 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Neuroscience 4 4%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 27 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2016.
All research outputs
#17,823,285
of 22,896,955 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
#115
of 175 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,336
of 315,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
#12
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,896,955 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 175 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.