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A robot-based behavioural task to quantify impairments in rapid motor decisions and actions after stroke

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, October 2016
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Title
A robot-based behavioural task to quantify impairments in rapid motor decisions and actions after stroke
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12984-016-0201-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Teige C. Bourke, Catherine R. Lowrey, Sean P. Dukelow, Stephen D. Bagg, Kathleen E. Norman, Stephen H. Scott

Abstract

Stroke can affect our ability to perform daily activities, although it can be difficult to identify the underlying functional impairment(s). Recent theories highlight the importance of sensory feedback in selecting future motor actions. This selection process can involve multiple processes to achieve a behavioural goal, including selective attention, feature/object recognition, and movement inhibition. These functions are often impaired after stroke, but existing clinical measures tend to explore these processes in isolation and without time constraints. We sought to characterize patterns of post-stroke impairments in a dynamic situation where individuals must identify and select spatial targets rapidly in a motor task engaging both arms. Impairments in generating rapid motor decisions and actions could guide functional rehabilitation targets, and identify potential of individuals to perform daily activities such as driving. Subjects were assessed in a robotic exoskeleton. Subjects used virtual paddles attached to their hands to hit away 200 virtual target objects falling towards them while avoiding 100 virtual distractors. The inclusion of distractor objects required subjects to rapidly assess objects located across the workspace and make motor decisions about which objects to hit. As many as 78 % of the 157 subjects with subacute stroke had impairments in individual global, spatial, temporal, or hand-specific task parameters relative to the 95 % performance bounds for 309 non-disabled control subjects. Subjects with stroke and neglect (Behavioural Inattention Test score <130; n = 28) were more often impaired in task parameters than other subjects with stroke. Approximately half of subjects with stroke hit proportionally more distractor objects than 95 % of controls, suggesting they had difficulty in attending to and selecting appropriate objects. This impairment was observed for affected and unaffected limbs including some whose motor performance was comparable to controls. The proportion of distractors hit also significantly correlated with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores for subjects with stroke (r s  < = - 0.48, P < 10(-9)). A simple robot-based task identified that many subjects with stroke have impairments in the rapid selection and generation of motor responses to task specific spatial goals in the workspace.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 149 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 45 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 15%
Researcher 18 12%
Student > Bachelor 17 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 20 13%
Unknown 19 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 16%
Neuroscience 24 16%
Psychology 19 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 10%
Engineering 15 10%
Other 26 17%
Unknown 27 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2016.
All research outputs
#4,596,195
of 8,577,291 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#300
of 505 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,703
of 249,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#11
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,577,291 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 505 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,515 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.