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Pervasive sequence patents cover the entire human genome

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 1,376)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
twitter
151 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
8 Facebook pages
googleplus
8 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Pervasive sequence patents cover the entire human genome
Published in
Genome Medicine, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/gm431
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey A Rosenfeld, Christopher E Mason

Abstract

The scope and eligibility of patents for genetic sequences have been debated for decades, but a critical case regarding gene patents (Association of Molecular Pathologists v. Myriad Genetics) is now reaching the US Supreme Court. Recent court rulings have supported the assertion that such patents can provide intellectual property rights on sequences as small as 15 nucleotides (15mers), but an analysis of all current US patent claims and the human genome presented here shows that 15mer sequences from all human genes match at least one other gene. The average gene matches 364 other genes as 15mers; the breast-cancer-associated gene BRCA1 has 15mers matching at least 689 other genes. Longer sequences (1,000 bp) still showed extensive cross-gene matches. Furthermore, 15mer-length claims from bovine and other animal patents could also claim as much as 84% of the genes in the human genome. In addition, when we expanded our analysis to full-length patent claims on DNA from all US patents to date, we found that 41% of the genes in the human genome have been claimed. Thus, current patents for both short and long nucleotide sequences are extraordinarily non-specific and create an uncertain, problematic liability for genomic medicine, especially in regard to targeted re-sequencing and other sequence diagnostic assays.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 151 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 6%
Switzerland 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
Peru 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Luxembourg 1 2%
Unknown 38 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Other 6 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 257. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2022.
All research outputs
#106,351
of 21,750,593 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#20
of 1,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#590
of 174,867 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,750,593 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,376 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 174,867 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.