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The vaginal microbiota, human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: what do we know and where are we going next?

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
18 tweeters
patent
3 patents
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
151 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
402 Mendeley
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Title
The vaginal microbiota, human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: what do we know and where are we going next?
Published in
Microbiome, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40168-016-0203-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anita Mitra, David A. MacIntyre, Julian R. Marchesi, Yun S. Lee, Phillip R. Bennett, Maria Kyrgiou

Abstract

The vaginal microbiota plays a significant role in health and disease of the female reproductive tract. Next-generation sequencing techniques based upon the analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes permit in-depth study of vaginal microbial community structure to a level of detail not possible with standard culture-based microbiological techniques. The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes both cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. Although the virus is highly prevalent, only a small number of women have a persistent HPV infection and subsequently develop clinically significant disease. There is emerging evidence which leads us to conclude that increased diversity of vaginal microbiota combined with reduced relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. is involved in HPV acquisition and persistence and the development of cervical precancer and cancer. In this review, we summarise the current literature and discuss potential mechanisms for the involvement of vaginal microbiota in the evolution of CIN and cervical cancer. The concept of manipulation of vaginal bacterial communities using pre- and probiotics is also discussed as an exciting prospect for the field of cervical pathology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 402 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 396 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 68 17%
Student > Master 54 13%
Student > Bachelor 52 13%
Researcher 51 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 29 7%
Other 71 18%
Unknown 77 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 93 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 75 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 46 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 2%
Other 30 7%
Unknown 111 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2021.
All research outputs
#844,262
of 19,163,209 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#272
of 1,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,548
of 305,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#15
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,163,209 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,157 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 305,254 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.