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Sex and Gender Medical Education Summit: a roadmap for curricular innovation.

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, October 2016
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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26 Dimensions

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Sex and Gender Medical Education Summit: a roadmap for curricular innovation.
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13293-016-0091-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eliza L. Chin, Eliza L. Chin, Marley Hoggatt, Alyson J. McGregor, Mary K. Rojek, Kimberly Templeton, Robert Casanova, Wendy S. Klein, Virginia M. Miller, Marjorie Jenkins

Abstract

The Sex and Gender Medical Education Summit: a roadmap for curricular innovation was a collaborative initiative of the American Medical Women's Association, Laura W. Bush Institute for Women's Health, Mayo Clinic, and Society for Women's Health Research (www.sgbmeducationsummit.com). It was held on October 18-19, 2015 to provide a unique venue for collaboration among nationally and internationally renowned experts in developing a roadmap for the incorporation of sex and gender based concepts into medical education curricula. The Summit engaged 148 in-person attendees for the 1 1/2-day program. Pre- and post-Summit surveys assessed the impact of the Summit, and workshop discussions provided a framework for informal consensus building. Sixty-one percent of attendees indicated that the Summit had increased their awareness of the importance of sex and gender specific medicine. Other comments indicate that the Summit had a significant impact for motivating a call to action among attendees and provided resources to initiate change in curricula within their home institutions. These educational efforts will help to ensure a sex and gender basis for delivery of health care in the future.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 31%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Lecturer 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 9 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 25%
Social Sciences 5 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 12 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2016.
All research outputs
#7,446,830
of 8,614,521 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#142
of 154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,735
of 247,279 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#12
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,614,521 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 154 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,279 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.