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Nuclear fallout provides a new link between aPKC and polarized cell trafficking

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, April 2016
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49 Mendeley
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Title
Nuclear fallout provides a new link between aPKC and polarized cell trafficking
Published in
BMC Biology, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12915-016-0253-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francisco J. Calero-Cuenca, José Manuel Espinosa-Vázquez, Miguel Reina-Campos, María T. Díaz-Meco, Jorge Moscat, Sol Sotillos

Abstract

Cell polarity, essential for cell physiology and tissue coherence, emerges as a consequence of asymmetric localization of protein complexes and directional trafficking of cellular components. Although molecules required in both processes are well known their relationship is still poorly understood. Here we show a molecular link between Nuclear Fallout (Nuf), an adaptor of Rab11-GTPase to the microtubule motor proteins during Recycling Endosome (RE) trafficking, and aPKC, a pivotal kinase in the regulation of cell polarity. We demonstrate that aPKC phosphorylates Nuf modifying its subcellular distribution. Accordingly, in aPKC mutants Nuf and Rab11 accumulate apically indicating altered RE delivery. We show that aPKC localization in the apico-lateral cortex is dynamic. When we block exocytosis, by means of exocyst-sec mutants, aPKC accumulates inside the cells. Moreover, apical aPKC concentration is reduced in nuf mutants, suggesting aPKC levels are maintained by recycling. We demonstrate that active aPKC interacts with Nuf, phosphorylating it and, as a result, modifying its subcellular distribution. We propose a regulatory loop by which Nuf promotes aPKC apical recycling until sufficient levels of active aPKC are reached. Thus, we provide a novel link between cell polarity regulation and traffic control in epithelia.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 47 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Bachelor 8 16%
Professor 6 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 10%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 49%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 33%
Chemical Engineering 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2016.
All research outputs
#7,446,836
of 8,614,521 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#891
of 917 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,397
of 246,974 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#30
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,614,521 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 917 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,974 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.