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The role of background diet on the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in healthy pre-menopausal women: a randomized, cross-over, controlled study

Overview of attention for article published in Lipids in Health and Disease, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
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2 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
The role of background diet on the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in healthy pre-menopausal women: a randomized, cross-over, controlled study
Published in
Lipids in Health and Disease, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12944-016-0341-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Megan Arnold Gomes, Xiaoyuan Jia, Iris Kolenski, Alison M. Duncan, Kelly A. Meckling

Abstract

The links between dietary fat intake, polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and breast cancer risk remain equivocal, with some studies pointing to improvements in risk upon omega-3 supplementation. However, the background diet is poorly controlled in most studies, potentially confounding this link. Therefore, this study examined the hypothesis that in order to see the benefits of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, the background diet must be low in fat. Of the 56 healthy, pre-menopausal women randomized to one of two experimental arms, consisting of a two-treatment, randomized, cross-over design, 41 completed the 10 month intervention. The two diet phases (habitual and low-fat) were separated by a washout phase, each lasting 3 menstrual cycles. During each diet phase, women were supplemented with 1.2 g eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid per day. Red blood cell fatty acid composition indicated that more eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid was incorporated in the low-fat diet than the habitual diet, though both diet phases resulted in significant increases in the omega-3 to omega-6 ratio. In the context of omega-3 supplementation in breast cancer risk reduction, we also measured fatty acid incorporation into nipple aspirate fluid. Similar changes to red blood cells were noted in nipple aspirate fluid, with higher incorporation of eicosapentaenoic acid in the low-fat diet phase. These data suggest that the total level of dietary fat has some direct impact on fatty acid partitioning in addition to the recognized importance of fatty acid ratios, and supports the hypothesis that dietary fat intake must be considered a confounder in supplementation trials. Additionally, we demonstrate that n3 supplementation both reaches and imparts improvements in lipid content and n3:n6 at the target breast tissue. Trial was been retrospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov (Reg NCT02816125 ).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Lecturer 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Master 6 15%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2019.
All research outputs
#832,225
of 14,596,192 outputs
Outputs from Lipids in Health and Disease
#52
of 1,052 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,890
of 289,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lipids in Health and Disease
#5
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,596,192 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,052 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,223 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.