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The misuse of Cyproheptadine: a non-communicable disease risk behaviour in Kinshasa population, Democratic Republic of Congo

Overview of attention for article published in Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
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Title
The misuse of Cyproheptadine: a non-communicable disease risk behaviour in Kinshasa population, Democratic Republic of Congo
Published in
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13011-016-0051-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aimée M. Lulebo, Carine D. Bavuidibo, Eric M. Mafuta, Josaphat D. Ndelo, Lievin’s Corneille M. Mputu, Dalton M. Kabundji, Paulin B. Mutombo

Abstract

Obesity is one of the main risk factors of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) worldwide, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The use of Cyproheptadine increases body weight and the risk of becoming obese. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of Cyproheptadine misuse in the Kinshasa population and to describe its characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted in two town sectors of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), over a 4 month period (May 2011 to August 2011). Data from 499 participants, aged between 13 and 55 years were collected and analyzed. Mean and standard deviation were used for quantitative variables and frequency and percentage for categorical variables. In order to determine the relationship between socio-demographic status and Cyproheptadine use the Chi-square test was conducted. Student's t-test was used to compare means age of Cyproheptadine users and non-users. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of Cyproheptadine use. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Overall, 499 participants were enrolled (352 females, 147 males, mean age ± standard deviation 24.9 ± 9.7 years) in the study. The majority of the study participants (72.9 %) had used Cyproheptadine as an appetite stimulant. Females were 11 times more likely to use Cryproheptadine (OR = 11.9; 95 % CI: 7.1-20.1) than males. People aged between 36 and 55 were three times less likely to use Cryproheptadine (OR = 0.3; 95 % CI: 0.2-0.8) compared to teenagers. More than half of the participants (69.0 %) declared to take daily Cyproheptadine. Half of the study participants (50.0 %) used Cyproheptadine for more than a year and also declared to combine it with Dexamethasone (87.6 %). This study shows that the Kinshasa population is significantly misusing Cyproheptadine and is highly exposed to its risk, including obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Master 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 10 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 31%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 13%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Psychology 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 11 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2022.
All research outputs
#12,758,129
of 22,491,736 outputs
Outputs from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#452
of 665 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,131
of 381,492 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,491,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 665 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 381,492 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them