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The effectiveness of a mobile application for the development of palpation and ultrasound imaging skills to supplement the traditional learning of physiotherapy students

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
178 Mendeley
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Title
The effectiveness of a mobile application for the development of palpation and ultrasound imaging skills to supplement the traditional learning of physiotherapy students
Published in
BMC Medical Education, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0775-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carolina Fernández-Lao, Irene Cantarero-Villanueva, Noelia Galiano-Castillo, Elena Caro-Morán, Lourdes Díaz-Rodríguez, Manuel Arroyo-Morales

Abstract

Mobile learning (m-learning) has becoming very popular in education due to the rapidly advancing technology in our society. The potentials of the mobile applications should be used to enhance the education process. Few mobile applications have been designed to complement the study of physical therapy skills for physiotherapy students. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a mobile application, as a supplement to traditional learning, is useful for physiotherapy students in the acquisition of palpation and ultrasound skills in the shoulder area. Forty-nine students participated in this single-blinded, randomized controlled study. They were randomly distributed into two groups: experimental, with free access to the mobile application; and control, with access to traditional learning materials on the topic. Objective structured clinical evaluation (OSCE) and multiple-choice questionnaire (MCQ) were used to assess the educational intervention. Then, we also assessed the time taken to get a reliable ultrasound image and to localize a specific shoulder structure by palpation. There was no significant intergroup difference in the acquisition of theoretical knowledge (p = .089). Scores were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group for the majority items in the ultrasound assessment; positioning of patient (p < .001), positioning of ultrasound probe (p = 0.007), handling of ultrasound probe (p = .013) and global OSCE (p < .001) and skills in palpation of the shoulder; position of patient (p = .009), direction of palpation contact (p = .021) and global OSCE (p = .034). There were no significant differences in the time required to perform the examination between groups in ultrasound (p = .944) and palpation (p = .393). The results from the post-program survey assessing the global satisfaction with the mobile application were high (8.200 ± .767), on an 11 numeric point rating scale. These results suggest the effectiveness of an m-learning program as a complement to traditional education for developing skills in ultrasound and palpation of the shoulder region in undergraduate physiotherapy students.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 178 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 177 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 15%
Student > Bachelor 18 10%
Researcher 17 10%
Lecturer 12 7%
Other 12 7%
Other 49 28%
Unknown 44 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 20%
Psychology 17 10%
Social Sciences 11 6%
Computer Science 6 3%
Other 23 13%
Unknown 47 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2016.
All research outputs
#4,042,668
of 8,686,406 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#740
of 1,332 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,532
of 246,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#20
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,686,406 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,332 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,487 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.