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Bacterial genome engineering and synthetic biology: combating pathogens

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
patent
3 patents

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
190 Mendeley
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Title
Bacterial genome engineering and synthetic biology: combating pathogens
Published in
BMC Microbiology, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0876-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Malathy Krishnamurthy, Richard T. Moore, Sathish Rajamani, Rekha G. Panchal

Abstract

The emergence and prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogenic bacteria poses a serious threat to human and animal health globally. Nosocomial infections and common ailments such as pneumonia, wound, urinary tract, and bloodstream infections are becoming more challenging to treat due to the rapid spread of MDR pathogenic bacteria. According to recent reports by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there is an unprecedented increase in the occurrence of MDR infections worldwide. The rise in these infections has generated an economic strain worldwide, prompting the WHO to endorse a global action plan to improve awareness and understanding of antimicrobial resistance. This health crisis necessitates an immediate action to target the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance in bacteria. The advent of new bacterial genome engineering and synthetic biology (SB) tools is providing promising diagnostic and treatment plans to monitor and treat widespread recalcitrant bacterial infections. Key advances in genetic engineering approaches can successfully aid in targeting and editing pathogenic bacterial genomes for understanding and mitigating drug resistance mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the application of specific genome engineering and SB methods such as recombineering, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and bacterial cell-cell signaling mechanisms for pathogen targeting. The utility of these tools in developing antibacterial strategies such as novel antibiotic production, phage therapy, diagnostics and vaccine production to name a few, are also highlighted. The prevalent use of antibiotics and the spread of MDR bacteria raise the prospect of a post-antibiotic era, which underscores the need for developing novel therapeutics to target MDR pathogens. The development of enabling SB technologies offers promising solutions to deliver safe and effective antibacterial therapies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 190 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 186 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 43 23%
Researcher 31 16%
Student > Bachelor 29 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 14%
Other 10 5%
Other 22 12%
Unknown 29 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 65 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 16 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 3%
Other 18 9%
Unknown 29 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2019.
All research outputs
#2,656,776
of 17,362,547 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#245
of 2,639 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,833
of 300,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#33
of 265 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,362,547 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,639 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,304 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 265 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.