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ApCPEB4, a non-prion domain containing homolog of ApCPEB, is involved in the initiation of long-term facilitation

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Brain, October 2016
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Title
ApCPEB4, a non-prion domain containing homolog of ApCPEB, is involved in the initiation of long-term facilitation
Published in
Molecular Brain, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13041-016-0271-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seung-Hee Lee, Jaehoon Shim, Ye-Hwang Cheong, Sun-Lim Choi, Yong-Woo Jun, Sue-Hyun Lee, Yeon-Su Chae, Jin-Hee Han, Yong-Seok Lee, Jin-A Lee, Chae-Seok Lim, Kausik Si, Stefan Kassabov, Igor Antonov, Eric R. Kandel, Bong-Kiun Kaang, Deok-Jin Jang

Abstract

Two pharmacologically distinct types of local protein synthesis are required for synapse- specific long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF) in Aplysia: one for initiation and the other for maintenance. ApCPEB, a rapamycin sensitive prion-like molecule regulates a form of local protein synthesis that is specifically required for the maintenance of the LTF. However, the molecular component of the local protein synthesis that is required for the initiation of LTF and that is sensitive to emetine is not known. Here, we identify a homolog of ApCPEB responsible for the initiation of LTF. ApCPEB4 which we have named after its mammalian CPEB4-like homolog lacks a prion-like domain, is responsive to 5-hydroxytryptamine, and is translated (but not transcribed) in an emetine-sensitive, rapamycin-insensitive, and PKA-dependent manner. The ApCPEB4 binds to different target RNAs than does ApCPEB. Knock-down of ApCPEB4 blocked the induction of LTF, whereas overexpression of ApCPEB4 reduces the threshold of the formation of LTF. Thus, our findings suggest that the two different forms of CPEBs play distinct roles in LTF; ApCPEB is required for maintenance of LTF, whereas the ApCPEB4, which lacks a prion-like domain, is required for the initiation of LTF.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 18%
Student > Bachelor 2 12%
Student > Master 2 12%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Unknown 5 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 4 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Unspecified 1 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 5 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2016.
All research outputs
#4,445,408
of 8,711,471 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Brain
#253
of 462 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,448
of 245,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Brain
#6
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,711,471 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 462 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.