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Seahorses in focus: local ecological knowledge of seahorse-watching operators in a tropical estuary

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, November 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Seahorses in focus: local ecological knowledge of seahorse-watching operators in a tropical estuary
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13002-016-0125-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria L. F. Ternes, Maria L. F. Ternes, Leopoldo C. Gerhardinger, Alexandre Schiavetti

Abstract

Seahorses are endangered teleost fishes under increasing human pressures worldwide. In Brazil, marine conservationists and policy-makers are thus often skeptical about the viability of sustainable human-seahorse interactions. This study focuses on local ecological knowledge on seahorses and the implications of their non-lethal touristic use by a coastal community in northeastern Brazil. Community-based seahorse-watching activities have been carried out in Maracaípe village since 1999, but remained uninvestigated until the present study. Our goal is to provide ethnoecological understanding on this non-extractive use to support seahorse conservation and management. We interviewed 32 informants through semi-structured questionnaires to assess their socioeconomic profile, their knowledge on seahorse natural history traits, human uses, threats and abundance trends. Seahorse-watching has high socioeconomic relevance, being the primary income source for all respondents. Interviewees elicited a body of knowledge on seahorse biology largely consistent with up-to-date research literature. Most informants (65.5 %) perceived no change in seahorse abundance. Their empirical knowledge often surpassed scientific reports, i.e. through remarks on trophic ecology; reproductive aspects, such as, behavior and breeding season; spatial and temporal distribution, suggesting seahorse migration related to environmental parameters. Seahorse-watching operators were aware of seahorse biological and ecological aspects. Despite the gaps remaining on biological data about certain seahorse traits, the respondents provided reliable information on all questions, adding ethnoecological remarks not yet assessed by conventional scientific surveys. We provide novel ethnobiological insight on non-extractive modes of human-seahorse interaction, eliciting environmental policies to integrate seahorse conservation with local ecological knowledge and innovative ideas for seahorse sustainable use. Our study resonates with calls for more active engagement with communities and their local ecologies if marine conservation and development are to be reconciled.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Unknown 81 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 19%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Professor 6 7%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 27%
Environmental Science 17 20%
Social Sciences 6 7%
Engineering 4 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 20 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2016.
All research outputs
#11,597,480
of 19,044,106 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#425
of 664 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,131
of 304,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#23
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,044,106 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 664 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 304,194 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.