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Effects of acute carbohydrate ingestion on anaerobic exercise performance

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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87 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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221 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of acute carbohydrate ingestion on anaerobic exercise performance
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12970-016-0152-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ben M. Krings, Jaden A. Rountree, Matthew J. McAllister, Patrick M. Cummings, Timothy J. Peterson, Brent J. Fountain, JohnEric W. Smith

Abstract

Carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation during endurance exercises has been shown to increase performance, but there is limited research with CHO supplementation during strength and conditioning exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of various levels of CHO ingestion during acute testing sessions requiring participants to complete a strength and conditioning program designed for collegiate athletes. Participants (n = 7) performed a series of exercises while ingesting an amino-acid electrolyte control (CON) or CON plus varying levels of CHO. The CHO beverages delivered a 2:1 (glucose: fructose) ratio at rates of 15 g/h, 30 g/h, and 60 g/h. The exercise protocol consisted of a series of short sprints, full body resistance training exercises, jumping, and shuttle running. Performance measurements were taken for sprint times, repetitions until failure [bench press, bent over row, biceps curl, overhead triceps extension], summation of total repetitions for all repetitions until failure, repetitions in a set time for two-foot line jumps, and 137-m shuttle times. A significant main effect (p < 0.05) was found in relation to CHO dose during the bench press final set repetitions to failure. Pairwise comparison with Bonferroni's correction identified that there was significant difference (p = 0.0024) between the dosage of 15 g/h and CON during bench press. Inferential statistics identified overall RT performance with a dosage of 15 g/h compared to 60 g/h and CON was 99.2 % (very likely) and 96.7 % (very likely) to have a beneficial effect. The results from this study suggest acute ingestion of CHO does not result in decrements in performance and may provide a beneficial effect to strength and conditioning performance. Strength and conditioning coaches may recommend their athletes ingest CHO during training sessions in order to maximize muscular adaptations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 87 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 221 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Unknown 212 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 56 25%
Student > Master 46 21%
Other 15 7%
Researcher 14 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 6%
Other 43 19%
Unknown 33 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 85 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 4%
Other 23 10%
Unknown 36 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 57. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2021.
All research outputs
#448,348
of 17,342,898 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#147
of 793 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,554
of 299,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#13
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,342,898 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 793 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 50.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,999 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.