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Relationship between sleep characteristics and measures of body size and composition in a nationally-representative sample

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Relationship between sleep characteristics and measures of body size and composition in a nationally-representative sample
Published in
BMC Obesity, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40608-016-0128-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qian Xiao, Fangyi Gu, Neil Caporaso, Charles E. Matthews

Abstract

Short sleep has been linked to obesity. However, sleep is a multidimensional behavior that cannot be characterized solely by sleep duration. There is limited study that comprehensively examined different sleep characteristics in relation to obesity. We examined various aspects of sleep in relation to adiposity in 2005-2006 NHANES participants who were 18 or older and free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, emphysema, chronic bronchitis and depression (N = 3995). Sleep characteristics were self-reported, and included duration, overall quality, onset latency, fragmentation, daytime sleepiness, snoring, and sleep disorders. Body measurements included weight, height, waist circumference, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measured fat mass. Snoring was associated with higher BMI (adjusted difference in kg/m(2) comparing snoring for 5+ nights/week with no snoring (95 % confidence interval), 1.85 (0.88, 2.83)), larger waist circumference (cm, 4.52 (2.29, 6.75)), higher percentage of body fat (%, 1.61 (0.84, 2.38)), and higher android/gynoid ratio (0.03 (0.01, 0.06)). The associations were independent of sleep duration and sleep quality, and cannot be explained by the existence of sleep disorders such as sleep apnea. Poor sleep quality (two or more problematic sleep conditions) and short sleep duration (<6 h) were also associated with higher measures of body size and fat composition, although the effects were attenuated after snoring was adjusted. In a nationally representative sample of healthy US adults, snoring, short sleep, and poor sleep quality were associated with higher adiposity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Student > Master 8 16%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 14 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2016.
All research outputs
#3,701,384
of 8,769,477 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#65
of 130 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,854
of 241,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#7
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,769,477 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 130 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.