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The risk of pulmonary tuberculosis in underground copper miners in Zambia exposed to respirable silica: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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Citations

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Readers on

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98 Mendeley
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Title
The risk of pulmonary tuberculosis in underground copper miners in Zambia exposed to respirable silica: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3547-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kingsley Ngosa, Rajen N. Naidoo

Abstract

Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) among underground miners exposed to silica remains a global problem. Although well described in gold and coal mining, risk in other mining entities are not as well documented. This study aims to determine dust-related dose response risk for PTB among underground miners exposed to silica dust in Zambia's copper mines. A cross sectional study of in-service miners (n = 357) was conducted at Occupational Health and Safety Institute (OHSI), Zambia. A systematic review of medical data over a 5-year period from assessments conducted by doctors at OHSI and statutory silica exposure data (n = 16678) from the Mine Safety Department (MSD) were analysed. Lifetime cumulative exposure metrics were calculated. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between PTB and lifetime exposure to silica, while adjusting for various confounders. The median respirable silica dust level was 0.3 mg/m(3) (range 0.1-1.3). The overall prevalence of PTB was 9.5 % (n = 34). High cumulative respirable silica dust category showed a statistically significant association with PTB (OR = 6.4 (95 % CI 1. 8-23)) and a significant trend of increasing disease prevalence with increasing cumulative respirable silica dust categories was observed (ptrend < 0.01). Smoking showed a statistically significant association with PTB with OR = 4.3 (95 % CI 1.9-9.9). Our results demonstrate the association of increased risk for certified active TB with cumulative respirable dust in a dose related manner among this sample of copper miners. There is need to intensify dust control measures and incorporate anti-smoking interventions into TB prevention and control programmes in the mines.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 98 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 17%
Researcher 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Other 6 6%
Other 17 17%
Unknown 32 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 8%
Environmental Science 5 5%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 18 18%
Unknown 35 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2016.
All research outputs
#14,346,761
of 21,353,399 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#10,597
of 13,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,092
of 311,347 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#682
of 864 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,353,399 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,846 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,347 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 864 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.