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Psychological, behavioral and social effects of disclosing Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers to research participants: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 901)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
120 Mendeley
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Title
Psychological, behavioral and social effects of disclosing Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers to research participants: a systematic review
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13195-016-0212-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. A. S. A. Bemelmans, K. Tromp, E. M. Bunnik, R. J. Milne, S. Badger, C. Brayne, M. H. Schermer, E. Richard

Abstract

Current Alzheimer's disease (AD) research initiatives focus on cognitively healthy individuals with biomarkers that are associated with the development of AD. It is unclear whether biomarker results should be returned to research participants and what the psychological, behavioral and social effects of disclosure are. This systematic review therefore examines the psychological, behavioral and social effects of disclosing genetic and nongenetic AD-related biomarkers to cognitively healthy research participants. We performed a systematic literature search in eight scientific databases. Three independent reviewers screened the identified records and selected relevant articles. Results extracted from the included articles were aggregated and presented per effect group. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the data synthesis. None of the identified studies examined the effects of disclosing nongenetic biomarkers. All studies but one concerned the disclosure of APOE genotype and were conducted in the USA. Study populations consisted largely of cognitively healthy first-degree relatives of AD patients. In this group, disclosure of an increased risk was not associated with anxiety, depression or changes in perceived risk in relation to family history. Disclosure of an increased risk did lead to an increase in specific test-related distress levels, health-related behavior changes and long-term care insurance uptake and possibly diminished memory functioning. In cognitively healthy research participants with a first-degree relative with AD, disclosure of APOE ε4-positivity does not lead to elevated anxiety and depression levels, but does increase test-related distress and results in behavior changes concerning insurance and health. We did not find studies reporting the effects of disclosing nongenetic biomarkers and only one study included people without a family history of AD. Empirical studies on the effects of disclosing nongenetic biomarkers and of disclosure to persons without a family history of AD are urgently needed. PROSPERO international prospective register for systematic reviews CRD42016035388 . Registered 19 February 2016.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 120 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 18%
Researcher 17 14%
Student > Master 16 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Other 9 8%
Other 23 19%
Unknown 22 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 13%
Neuroscience 12 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 9%
Social Sciences 8 7%
Other 23 19%
Unknown 31 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 95. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2018.
All research outputs
#261,097
of 17,499,602 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#31
of 901 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,088
of 296,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#5
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,499,602 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 901 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,674 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.