↓ Skip to main content

Differentiating Plasmodium falciparum alleles by transforming Cartesian X,Y data to polar coordinates

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genetics, June 2010
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Differentiating Plasmodium falciparum alleles by transforming Cartesian X,Y data to polar coordinates
Published in
BMC Genetics, June 2010
DOI 10.1186/1471-2156-11-57
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeana T DaRe, Drew P Kouri, Peter A Zimmerman, Peter J Thomas

Abstract

Diagnosis of infectious diseases now benefits from advancing technology to perform multiplex analysis of a growing number of variables. These advances enable simultaneous surveillance of markers characterizing species and strain complexity, mutations associated with drug susceptibility, and antigen-based polymorphisms in relation to evaluation of vaccine effectiveness. We have recently developed assays detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the P. falciparum genome that take advantage of post-PCR ligation detection reaction and fluorescent microsphere labeling strategies. Data from these assays produce a spectrum of outcomes showing that infections result from single to multiple strains. Traditional methods for distinguishing true positive signal from background can cause false positive diagnoses leading to incorrect interpretation of outcomes associated with disease treatment.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 8%
United States 1 4%
Unknown 21 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 42%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 25%
Professor 1 4%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Computer Science 2 8%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2010.
All research outputs
#567,095
of 3,684,317 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genetics
#55
of 388 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,343
of 85,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genetics
#4
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,684,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 388 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 85,541 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.