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A novel phase variant of the cholera pathogen shows stress-adaptive cryptic transcriptomic signatures

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, November 2016
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Title
A novel phase variant of the cholera pathogen shows stress-adaptive cryptic transcriptomic signatures
Published in
BMC Genomics, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-3233-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bliss Lambert, Maheshi Dassanayake, Dong-Ha Oh, Shana B. Garrett, Sang-Yeol Lee, Gregg S. Pettis

Abstract

In a process known as phase variation, the marine bacterium and cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae alternately expresses smooth or rugose colonial phenotypes, the latter being associated with advanced biofilm architecture and greater resistance to ecological stress. To define phase variation at the transcriptomic level in pandemic V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain N16961, we compared the RNA-seq-derived transcriptomes among the smooth parent N16961, its rugose derivative (N16961R) and a smooth form obtained directly from the rugose at high frequencies consistent with phase variation (N16961SD). Differentially regulated genes which clustered into co-expression groups were identified for specific cellular functions, including acetate metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and anaerobic respiration, suggesting an important link between these processes and biofilm formation in this species. Principal component analysis separated the transcriptome of N16961SD from the other phase variants. Although N16961SD was defective in biofilm formation, transcription of its biofilm-related vps and rbm gene clusters was nevertheless elevated as judged by both RNA-seq and RT-qPCR analyses. This transcriptome signature was shared with N16961R, as were others involving two-component signal transduction, chemotaxis, and c-di-GMP synthesis functions. Precise turnarounds in gene expression did not accompany reversible phase transitions (i.e., smooth to rugose to smooth) in the cholera pathogen. Transcriptomic signatures consisting of up-regulated genes involved in biofilm formation, environmental sensing and persistence, chemotaxis, and signal transduction, which were shared by N16961R and N16961SD variants, may implicate a stress adaptation in the pathogen that facilitates transition of the N16961SD smooth form back to rugosity should environmental conditions dictate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 25%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 29%
Unspecified 1 4%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 5 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2016.
All research outputs
#10,328,867
of 16,184,378 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#5,553
of 8,958 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,032
of 241,330 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#551
of 861 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,184,378 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,958 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,330 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 861 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.