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Biomarkers in acute myocardial infarction

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, June 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
147 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
381 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Biomarkers in acute myocardial infarction
Published in
BMC Medicine, June 2010
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-8-34
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Chan, Leong L Ng

Abstract

Myocardial infarction causes significant mortality and morbidity. Timely diagnosis allows clinicians to risk stratify their patients and select appropriate treatment. Biomarkers have been used to assist with timely diagnosis, while an increasing number of novel markers have been identified to predict outcome following an acute myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome. This may facilitate tailoring of appropriate therapy to high-risk patients. This review focuses on a variety of promising biomarkers which provide diagnostic and prognostic information. Heart-type Fatty Acid Binding Protein and copeptin in combination with cardiac troponin help diagnose myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome in the early hours following symptoms. An elevated N-Terminal Pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide has been well validated to predict death and heart failure following a myocardial infarction. Similarly other biomarkers such as Mid-regional pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, ST2, C-Terminal pro-endothelin 1, Mid-regional pro-Adrenomedullin and copeptin all provide incremental information in predicting death and heart failure. Growth differentiation factor-15 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predict death following an acute coronary syndrome. Pregnancy associated plasma protein A levels following chest pain predicts risk of myocardial infarction and revascularisation. Some biomarkers such as myeloperoxidase and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in an apparently healthy population predicts risk of coronary disease and allows clinicians to initiate early preventative treatment. In addition to biomarkers, various well-validated scoring systems based on clinical characteristics are available to help clinicians predict mortality risk, such as the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score. A multimarker approach incorporating biomarkers and clinical scores will increase the prognostic accuracy. However, it is important to note that only troponin has been used to direct therapeutic intervention and none of the new prognostic biomarkers have been tested and proven to alter outcome of therapeutic intervention. Novel biomarkers have improved prediction of outcome in acute myocardial infarction, but none have been demonstrated to alter the outcome of a particular therapy or management strategy. Randomised trials are urgently needed to address this translational gap before the use of novel biomarkers becomes common practice to facilitate tailored treatment following an acute coronary event.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 381 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Turkey 2 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 362 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 16%
Student > Bachelor 58 15%
Student > Master 55 14%
Researcher 42 11%
Student > Postgraduate 38 10%
Other 90 24%
Unknown 36 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 184 48%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 7%
Chemistry 11 3%
Engineering 11 3%
Other 43 11%
Unknown 48 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2017.
All research outputs
#829,145
of 11,332,834 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#752
of 1,808 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,908
of 130,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#39
of 85 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,332,834 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,808 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 130,164 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.