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Changes in antidiabetic prescription patterns and indicators of diabetic control among 200,000 patients over 13 years at a single institution in Japan

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, November 2016
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Title
Changes in antidiabetic prescription patterns and indicators of diabetic control among 200,000 patients over 13 years at a single institution in Japan
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13098-016-0187-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kazutoshi Fujibayashi, Kazutoshi Fujibayashi, Michio Hayashi, Hirohide Yokokawa, Toshio Naito

Abstract

We examined the long-term changes in the management of diabetes at a single institution in Japan. Two repeated cross-sectional studies and a retrospective cohort study were conducted among patients who visited our institution between 2001 and 2013. We examined the changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin levels, the prescription frequencies, and the daily doses of each antidiabetic agent among patients treated regularly for diabetes during the 13-year study period. The trends in control and treatment parameters were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. In the first repeated cross-sectional studies, 200,298 patients had their glucose metabolism indicators measured, and diabetologists prescribed medications to 193, 445 patients. Of these, 170 patients were included in the retrospective cohort study. The patients' diabetic control tended to improve over the study period. The mean HbA1c level improved from 7.9 to 7.6% (from 63 to 60 mmol/mol) (rs = -0.11, p < 0.01) in the cross-sectional study, corresponding to a change from 8.2 to 7.7% (from 66 to 61 mmol/mol) (rs = -0.22, p < 0.01) in the retrospective study. The mean GA level improved from 22.7 to 20.7% (rs = -0.13, p < 0.01) in the cross-sectional study and from 23.5 to 21.5% (rs = -0.14, p < 0.01) in the retrospective study. Over the study period, prescription frequencies and daily doses of antidiabetic agents changed as treatment guidelines were altered. The present study revealed a tendency toward long-term improvements in diabetic control, with changes in the prescription patterns consistent with research and guideline evidence.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Lecturer 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Student > Master 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 14%
Unknown 2 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2016.
All research outputs
#7,483,866
of 8,629,768 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#255
of 303 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#237,679
of 294,920 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,629,768 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 303 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,920 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.