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Attribution of net carbon change by disturbance type across forest lands of the conterminous United States

Overview of attention for article published in Carbon Balance and Management, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 202)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
31 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
22 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
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Title
Attribution of net carbon change by disturbance type across forest lands of the conterminous United States
Published in
Carbon Balance and Management, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13021-016-0066-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

N. L. Harris, S. C. Hagen, S. S. Saatchi, T. R. H. Pearson, C. W. Woodall, G. M. Domke, B. H. Braswell, B. F. Walters, S. Brown, W. Salas, A. Fore, Y. Yu

Abstract

Locating terrestrial sources and sinks of carbon (C) will be critical to developing strategies that contribute to the climate change mitigation goals of the Paris Agreement. Here we present spatially resolved estimates of net C change across United States (US) forest lands between 2006 and 2010 and attribute them to natural and anthropogenic processes. Forests in the conterminous US sequestered -460 ± 48 Tg C year(-1), while C losses from disturbance averaged 191 ± 10 Tg C year(-1). Combining estimates of net C losses and gains results in net carbon change of -269 ± 49 Tg C year(-1). New forests gained -8 ± 1 Tg C year(-1), while deforestation resulted in losses of 6 ± 1 Tg C year(-1). Forest land remaining forest land lost 185 ± 10 Tg C year(-1) to various disturbances; these losses were compensated by net carbon gains of -452 ± 48 Tg C year(-1). C loss in the southern US was highest (105 ± 6 Tg C year(-1)) with the highest fractional contributions from harvest (92%) and wind (5%). C loss in the western US (44 ± 3 Tg C year(-1)) was due predominantly to harvest (66%), fire (15%), and insect damage (13%). The northern US had the lowest C loss (41 ± 2 Tg C year(-1)) with the most significant proportional contributions from harvest (86%), insect damage (9%), and conversion (3%). Taken together, these disturbances reduced the estimated potential C sink of US forests by 42%. The framework presented here allows for the integration of ground and space observations to more fully inform US forest C policy and monitoring efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 60 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 18%
Student > Master 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 5%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 24 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 8%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Chemistry 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 14 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 290. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2021.
All research outputs
#64,481
of 17,512,897 outputs
Outputs from Carbon Balance and Management
#2
of 202 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,540
of 392,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Carbon Balance and Management
#1
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,512,897 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 202 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 392,026 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.