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The extent of using mobility assistive devices can partly explain fatigue among persons with late effects of polio – a retrospective registry study in Sweden

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, November 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
The extent of using mobility assistive devices can partly explain fatigue among persons with late effects of polio – a retrospective registry study in Sweden
Published in
BMC Neurology, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12883-016-0753-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

I. Santos Tavares Silva, K. S. Sunnerhagen, C. Willén, I. Ottenvall Hammar

Abstract

Fatigue is reported as one of the most disabling symptoms and is common among persons living with late effects of polio. Although fatigue has been studied in the context of people living with late effects of polio, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the association of fatigue and variables of importance for participation in daily life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore possible factors associated with fatigue among persons with late effects of polio in Sweden. This retrospective registry study consisted of 89 persons with late effects of polio living in Sweden. Fatigue was measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) scale, Swedish version. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to analyse the correlation between the factors and fatigue, and a multiple linear regression was carried out to explore factors for fatigue. Fatigue statistically significantly correlated with age (r = 0.234, p < 0.05) and the use of mobility assistive devices (r = 0.255, p < 0.05). The multiple linear regression model showed that the factors age (β = 0.304, p < 0.019) and mobility assistive devices (β = 0.262, p < 0.017) were associated with fatigue among persons living with late effects of polio, and the model partly explained 14% of the variation of fatigue. Fatigue could partly be explained by the extent of using mobility assistive devices and age. Healthcare professionals should provide and demonstrate the importance of assistive devices to ensure management of fatigue in persons living with late effects of polio.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 19%
Student > Master 6 14%
Researcher 5 12%
Other 3 7%
Professor 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 14 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 14%
Chemistry 2 5%
Engineering 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 10 24%
Unknown 15 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2016.
All research outputs
#12,000,006
of 20,110,162 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#997
of 2,147 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,948
of 413,875 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#113
of 186 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,110,162 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,147 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 413,875 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 186 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.