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Perceived needs and health-related quality of life in people with schizophrenia and metabolic syndrome: a “real-world” study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, November 2016
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Title
Perceived needs and health-related quality of life in people with schizophrenia and metabolic syndrome: a “real-world” study
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-1005-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leticia Medeiros-Ferreira, José Blas Navarro-Pastor, Antonio Zúñiga-Lagares, Rosanna Romaní, Elisenda Muray, Jordi E. Obiols

Abstract

The complexity of schizophrenia lies in the combination of psychiatric, somatic and social needs requiring care. The aim of the study was to compare perceived needs between groups with absence/presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to analyze the relationship between needs, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and MetS in people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. A "real-world" cross-sectional study was set up with a comprehensive framework including the following, needs for care (Camberwell Assessment of Need Interview [CAN]), HRQoL (Euro Qol-5D Questionnaire), sociodemographic data, lifestyle habits, psychopathology (Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale [PANSS]), global functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning Scale [GAF]), anthropometric measurements and blood test results were assessed for an outpatient sample (n = 60). The mean number of needs (given by CAN) was identified for both groups. Patients with MetS rated a higher number of needs compared to the group without this condition. Mobility problems (given by EQ-5D) were negatively associated with the number of total and unmet needs. For participants with MetS, HRQoL was related to the number of needs and unmet needs. For people with MetS, positive symptomatology score (given by PANSS) was related to the number of needs and met needs and general symptomatology was associated with total, met and unmet needs. For individuals without MetS, the global functioning score (given by GAF) was significantly inversely related with total, met and unmet needs. Needs and HRQoL, as well as general symptomatology, were related only in patients with MetS. This has implications for treatment planning at the individual and organizational levels. An analysis of both physical and mental needs could provide a starting point for the extension of facilities in the health care system in order to reach the goal of improving quality of life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 16%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Master 7 14%
Other 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 15 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 11 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 16%
Psychology 4 8%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 19 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2017.
All research outputs
#12,842,441
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#3,001
of 3,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#313,277
of 380,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#374
of 428 outputs
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