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Human class I major histocompatibility complex alleles determine central nervous system injury versus repair

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, November 2016
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Title
Human class I major histocompatibility complex alleles determine central nervous system injury versus repair
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12974-016-0759-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bharath Wootla, Aleksandar Denic, Jens O. Watzlawik, Arthur E. Warrington, Laurie J. Zoecklein, Louisa M. Papke-Norton, Chella David, Moses Rodriguez

Abstract

We investigated the role of human HLA class I molecules in persistent central nervous system (CNS) injury versus repair following virus infection of the CNS. Human class I A11(+) and B27(+) transgenic human beta-2 microglobulin positive (Hβ2m(+)) mice of the H-2 (b) background were generated on a combined class I-deficient (mouse beta-2 microglobulin deficient, β2m(0)) and class II-deficient (mouse Aβ(0)) phenotype. Intracranial infection with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in susceptible SJL mice results in acute encephalitis with prominent injury in the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex. Following infection with TMEV, a picornavirus, the Aβ(0).β2m(0) mice lacking active immune responses died within 18 to 21 days post-infection. These mice showed severe encephalomyelitis due to rapid replication of the viral genome. In contrast, transgenic Hβ2m mice with insertion of a single human class I MHC gene in the absence of human or mouse class II survived the acute infection. Both A11(+) and B27(+) mice significantly controlled virus RNA expression by 45 days and did not develop late-onset spinal cord demyelination. By 45 days post-infection (DPI), B27(+) transgenic mice showed almost complete repair of the virus-induced brain injury, but A11(+) mice conversely showed persistent severe hippocampal and cortical injury. The findings support the hypothesis that the expression of a single human class I MHC molecule, independent of persistent virus infection, influences the extent of sub frequent chronic neuronal injury or repair in the absence of a class II MHC immune response.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 35%
Researcher 6 30%
Student > Master 4 20%
Professor 1 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 20%
Neuroscience 3 15%
Arts and Humanities 2 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Other 5 25%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2016.
All research outputs
#17,351,733
of 21,474,792 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1,937
of 2,482 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#309,739
of 423,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#150
of 190 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,474,792 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,482 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 190 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.