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The changing phenotype of microglia from homeostasis to disease

Overview of attention for article published in Translational Neurodegeneration, April 2012
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Title
The changing phenotype of microglia from homeostasis to disease
Published in
Translational Neurodegeneration, April 2012
DOI 10.1186/2047-9158-1-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiao-Guang Luo, Sheng-Di Chen

Abstract

It has been nearly a century since the early description of microglia by Rio-Hortega; since then many more biological and pathological features of microglia have been recognized. Today, microglia are generally considered to be beneficial to homeostasis at the resting state through their abilities to survey the environment and phagocytose debris. However, when activated microglia assume diverse phenotypes ranging from fully inflamed, which involves the release of many pro-inflammatory cytokines, to alternatively activated, releasing anti-inflammatory cytokines or neurotrophins, the consequences to neurons can range from detrimental to supportive. Due to the different experimental sets and conditions, contradictory results have been obtained regarding the controversial question of whether microglia are "good" or "bad." While it is well understood that the dual roles of activated microglia depend on specific situations, the underlying mechanisms have remained largely unclear, and the interpretation of certain findings related to diverse microglial phenotypes continues to be problematic. In this review we discuss the functions of microglia in neuronal survival and neurogenesis, the crosstalk between microglia and surrounding cells, and the potential factors that could influence the eventual manifestation of microglia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 265 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Serbia 1 <1%
Unknown 258 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 74 28%
Researcher 45 17%
Student > Master 42 16%
Student > Bachelor 37 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Other 22 8%
Unknown 30 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 99 37%
Neuroscience 49 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 3%
Other 18 7%
Unknown 34 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2014.
All research outputs
#12,651,928
of 16,578,610 outputs
Outputs from Translational Neurodegeneration
#184
of 211 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,900
of 158,736 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Translational Neurodegeneration
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,578,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 211 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.8. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,736 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
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