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Correlations between angiogenic factors and capillaroscopic patterns in systemic sclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2013
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Title
Correlations between angiogenic factors and capillaroscopic patterns in systemic sclerosis
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/ar4217
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jérôme Avouac, Maeva Vallucci, Vanessa Smith, Patricia Senet, Barbara Ruiz, Alberto Sulli, Carmen Pizzorni, Camille Frances, Gilles Chiocchia, Maurizio Cutolo, Yannick Allanore

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: We sought to assess whether nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) patterns are associated with levels of angiogenic factors in systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS: Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) were measured in the peripheral blood of 60 consecutive SSc patients. Serum levels of eight endothelial markers were measured first in these 60 patients, and then in an independent replication cohort of 43 SSc patients in case of association with NVC patterns. NVC patterns were determined by four independent investigators blinded to vascular markers. RESULTS: Patients with the late-NVC pattern exhibited lower EPC levels (P < 0.0001) and higher VEGF levels (P = 0.03). Higher VEGF levels were confirmed to be associated with the late-NVC pattern in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). By multivariate analysis focused on biomarkers, lower EPC (P = 0.03) and higher VEGF levels (P = 0.001) were independently associated with the late-NVC pattern. In an alternate multivariate model including these two factors and SSc-related disease characteristics, lower EPC counts (P = 0.005), higher VEGF levels (P = 0.01), a history of digital ulcers (P = 0.04), and a modified Rodnan skin score > 14 (P < 0.0001) were independently associated with the late-NVC pattern. CONCLUSION: Our data revealed decreased EPC counts and increased VEGF levels in patients with the late-NVC pattern. Further studies are now needed to determine the role of VEGF and EPCs in endothelial injury and repair in SSc.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Other 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Student > Master 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 45%
Engineering 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 9 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2013.
All research outputs
#11,070,245
of 12,451,992 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,884
of 1,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,645
of 144,601 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#5
of 5 outputs
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