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Heme oxygenase and carbon monoxide protect from muscle dystrophy

Overview of attention for article published in Skeletal Muscle, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
Heme oxygenase and carbon monoxide protect from muscle dystrophy
Published in
Skeletal Muscle, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13395-016-0114-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mun Chun Chan, Olivia Ziegler, Laura Liu, Glenn C. Rowe, Saumya Das, Leo E. Otterbein, Zoltan Arany

Abstract

Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases of children worldwide and is 100% fatal. Steroids, the only therapy currently available, are marred by poor efficacy and a high side-effect profile. New therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. Here, we leverage PGC-1α, a powerful transcriptional coactivator known to protect against dystrophy in the mdx murine model of DMD, to search for novel mechanisms of protection against dystrophy. We identify heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as a potential novel target for the treatment of DMD. Expression of HO-1 is blunted in the muscles from the mdx murine model of DMD, and further reduction of HO-1 by genetic haploinsufficiency worsens muscle damage in mdx mice. Conversely, induction of HO-1 pharmacologically protects against muscle damage. Mechanistically, HO-1 degrades heme into biliverdin, releasing in the process ferrous iron and carbon monoxide (CO). We show that exposure to a safe low dose of CO protects against muscle damage in mdx mice, as does pharmacological treatment with CO-releasing molecules. These data identify HO-1 and CO as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of DMD. Safety profiles and clinical testing of inhaled CO already exist, underscoring the translational potential of these observations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2018.
All research outputs
#3,065,372
of 12,452,101 outputs
Outputs from Skeletal Muscle
#106
of 236 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,906
of 359,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Skeletal Muscle
#7
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,452,101 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 236 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 359,209 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.