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Post-marketing withdrawal of anti-obesity medicinal products because of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, November 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
291 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
67 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
109 Mendeley
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Title
Post-marketing withdrawal of anti-obesity medicinal products because of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review
Published in
BMC Medicine, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12916-016-0735-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Igho J. Onakpoya, Carl J. Heneghan, Jeffrey K. Aronson

Abstract

We identified anti-obesity medications withdrawn since 1950 because of adverse drug reactions after regulatory approval, and examined the evidence used to support such withdrawals, investigated the mechanisms of the adverse reactions, and explored the trends over time. We conducted searches in PubMed, the World Health Organization database of drugs, the websites of drug regulatory authorities, and selected full texts, and we hand searched references in retrieved documents. We included anti-obesity medications that were withdrawn between 1950 and December 2015 and assessed the levels of evidence used for making withdrawal decisions using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine criteria. We identified 25 anti-obesity medications withdrawn between 1964 and 2009; 23 of these were centrally acting, via monoamine neurotransmitters. Case reports were cited as evidence for withdrawal in 80% of instances. Psychiatric disturbances, cardiotoxicity (mainly attributable to re-uptake inhibitors), and drug abuse or dependence (mainly attributable to neurotransmitter releasing agents) together accounted for 83% of withdrawals. Deaths were reportedly associated with seven products (28%). In almost half of the cases, the withdrawals occurred within 2 years of the first report of an adverse reaction. Most of the drugs that affect monoamine neurotransmitters licensed for the treatment of obesity over the past 65 years have been withdrawn because of adverse reactions. The reasons for withdrawal raise concerns about the wisdom of using pharmacological agents that target monoamine neurotransmitters in managing obesity. Greater transparency in the assessment of harms from anti-obesity medications is therefore warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 291 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 109 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 16%
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Bachelor 15 14%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 26 24%
Unknown 16 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 16 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 6%
Other 23 21%
Unknown 22 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 246. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2021.
All research outputs
#89,779
of 18,951,205 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#81
of 2,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,205
of 407,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#6
of 213 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,951,205 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,841 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 407,320 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 213 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.