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Characterizing the impact of sustained sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine use upon the Plasmodium falciparum population in Malawi

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2016
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Characterizing the impact of sustained sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine use upon the Plasmodium falciparum population in Malawi
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1634-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matt Ravenhall, Ernest Diez Benavente, Mwapatsa Mipando, Anja T. R. Jensen, Colin J. Sutherland, Cally Roper, Nuno Sepúlveda, Dominic P. Kwiatkowski, Jacqui Montgomery, Kamija S. Phiri, Anja Terlouw, Alister Craig, Susana Campino, Harold Ocholla, Taane G. Clark

Abstract

Malawi experienced prolonged use of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) as the front-line anti-malarial drug, with early replacement of chloroquine and delayed introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy. Extended use of SP, and its continued application in pregnancy is impacting the genomic variation of the Plasmodium falciparum population. Whole genome sequence data of P. falciparum isolates covering 2 years of transmission within Malawi, alongside global datasets, were used. More than 745,000 SNPs were identified, and differences in allele frequencies between countries assessed, as well as genetic regions under positive selection determined. Positive selection signals were identified within dhps, dhfr and gch1, all components of the parasite folate pathway associated with SP resistance. Sitting predominantly on a dhfr triple mutation background, a novel copy number increase of ~twofold was identified in the gch1 promoter. This copy number was almost fixed (96.8% frequency) in Malawi samples, but found at less than 45% frequency in other African populations, and distinct from a whole gene duplication previously reported in Southeast Asian parasites. SP resistance selection pressures have been retained in the Malawian population, with known resistance dhfr mutations at fixation, complemented by a novel gch1 promoter duplication. The effects of the duplication on the fitness costs of SP variants and resistance need to be elucidated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 69 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Lecturer 4 6%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 10 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 13 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2017.
All research outputs
#13,488,874
of 22,903,988 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,538
of 5,581 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#208,039
of 416,538 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#53
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,903,988 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,581 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 416,538 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.