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Food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university: results of an online survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2016
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1 tweeter

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Title
Food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university: results of an online survey
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3818-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah M. Courtney, Shannon E. Majowicz, Joel A. Dubin

Abstract

Foodborne diseases are an important public health issue, and young adults are an important demographic to target with food safety education. Our objective was to assess the food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university, to identify potential areas for such education. In February 2015, we conducted an online survey of 485 undergraduate students at a university in Ontario, Canada. We assessed various food-related factors, including cooking frequency and prior food handling or preparation education. We then modeled the relationship between 'overall knowledge score' and the demographic and food skills/cooking experience predictors using multivariable log-binomial regression, to determine factors associated with relatively higher proportions of correct responses. Respondents were, on average, 20.5 years old, and the majority (64.8 %) lived off campus. Students cooked from basic ingredients infrequently, with 3 in 4 doing so a few times a year to never. Students averaged 6.2 correct answers to the 11 knowledge questions. Adjusting for other important covariates, older age and being a current food handler were associated with relatively higher knowledge, whereas working/volunteering in a hospital and infrequent cooking were associated with relatively lower knowledge. Males in the Faculty of Science had relatively higher knowledge than females in the Faculty of Science, both of whom had relatively higher knowledge than all students in other Faculties. Among students who had never taken a food preparation course, knowledge increased with self-reported cooking ability; however, among students who had taken such a course, knowledge was highest among those with low self-reported cooking ability. Consistent with other similar studies, students in Faculties outside of the Faculty of Science, younger students, and those who cook infrequently could benefit from food safety education. Supporting improved hand hygiene, in particular clarifying hand washing versus hand sanitizing messages, may also be important. Universities can play a role in such education, including as part of preparing students for work or volunteer placements, or as general support for student health and success.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 139 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 37 27%
Student > Master 20 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 10%
Researcher 6 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 3%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 42 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 10%
Social Sciences 12 9%
Environmental Science 11 8%
Other 20 14%
Unknown 46 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2016.
All research outputs
#12,589,282
of 15,850,637 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#9,400
of 10,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#274,247
of 390,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#723
of 839 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,850,637 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 839 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.