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Patterns of medication use and factors associated with antibiotic use among adult fever patients at Singapore primary care clinics

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Patterns of medication use and factors associated with antibiotic use among adult fever patients at Singapore primary care clinics
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13756-016-0146-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zaw Myo Tun, Zaw Myo Tun, Mahesh Moorthy, Martin Linster, Yvonne C. F. Su, Richard James Coker, Eng Eong Ooi, Jenny Guek-Hong Low, Gavin J. D. Smith, Clarence C. Tam

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance is a public health problem of global importance. In Singapore, much focus has been given to antibiotic usage patterns in hospital settings. Data on antibiotic use in primary care is lacking. We describe antibiotic usage patterns and assess factors contributing to antibiotic usage among adults presenting with acute febrile illness (AFI) in primary care settings in Singapore. We analyzed data from the Early Dengue infection and outcome study. Adults with AFI presenting at 5 Singapore polyclinics were included. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess demographic, clinical and laboratory factors associated with antibiotic usage among adults with AFI. Between December 2007 and February 2013, 1884 adult AFI patients were enrolled. Overall, 16% of adult AFI patients reported antibiotic use. We observed a rise in the use of over-the-counter medications in late 2009 and a decrease in antibiotic use during 2010, possibly related to the outbreak of pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus. After adjusting for age, gender, polyclinic and year of enrolment, the following factors were associated with higher odds of antibiotic use: living in landed property (compared to public housing) (OR = 1.73; 95% CI: 1.06-2.80); body mass index (BMI) <18.5 (OR = 1.87; 95% CI: 1.19-2.93); elevated white blood cell (WBC) count (OR = 1.98; 95% CI: 1.42-2.78); and persistence of initial symptoms at 2-3 days follow-up with OR (95% CI) for categories of 1, 2, 3, and ≥4 persisting symptoms being 2.00 (1.38-2.92), 2.67 (1.80-3.97), 4.26 (2.73-6.64), and 2.79 (1.84-4.24) respectively. Our study provides insights on antibiotic usage among adult patients presenting to primary care clinics with febrile illness, and suggests that high socio-economic status, and risk factors of a severe illness, that is, low BMI and persistence of initial symptoms, are associated with higher antibiotic use. Further work to understand trends of antibiotic usage in both private and public primary care clinics, and factors that influence patient expectation and physician prescribing of antibiotics is important.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Other 3 6%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 31%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Psychology 3 6%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 16 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2016.
All research outputs
#4,058,578
of 8,713,305 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#263
of 360 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,812
of 299,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#29
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,713,305 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 360 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,495 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.