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Colonization strategies of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1: activation of soil-specific genes important for diverse and specific environments

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, April 2013
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
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Title
Colonization strategies of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1: activation of soil-specific genes important for diverse and specific environments
Published in
BMC Microbiology, April 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2180-13-92
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katila Varivarn, Lindsey A Champa, Mark W Silby, Eduardo A Robleto

Abstract

Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common inhabitant of soil and the rhizosphere environment. In addition to potential applications in biocontrol and bioremediation, P. fluorescens is of interest as a model for studying bacterial survival and fitness in soil. A previous study using in vivo expression technology (IVET) identified 22 genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1 which are up-regulated during growth in Massachusetts loam soil, a subset of which are important for fitness in soil. Despite this and other information on adaptation to soil, downstream applications such as biocontrol or bioremediation in diverse soils remain underdeveloped. We undertook an IVET screen to identify Pf0-1 genes induced during growth in arid Nevada desert soil, to expand our understanding of growth in soil environments, and examine whether Pf0-1 uses general or soil type-specific mechanisms for success in soil environments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 2%
Unknown 55 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 32%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Master 5 9%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 14%
Environmental Science 5 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Chemistry 3 5%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2013.
All research outputs
#3,075,782
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#604
of 906 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,080
of 88,763 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#26
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 906 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.