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Shifting tides in the emigration patterns of Canadian physicians to the United States: a cross-sectional secondary data analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
32 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
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Title
Shifting tides in the emigration patterns of Canadian physicians to the United States: a cross-sectional secondary data analysis
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1908-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas R. Freeman, Stephen Petterson, Sean Finnegan, Andrew Bazemore

Abstract

The relative ease of movement of physicians across the Canada/US border has led to what is sometimes referred to as a 'brain drain' and previous analysis estimated that the equivalent of two graduating classes from Canadian medical schools were leaving to practice in the US each year. Both countries fill gaps in physician supply with international medical graduates (IMGs) so the movement of Canadian trained physicians to the US has international ramifications. Medical school enrolments have been increased on both sides of the border, yet there continues to be concerns about adequacy of physician human resources. This analysis was undertaken to re-examine the issue of Canadian physician migration to the US. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2015 American Medical Association (AMA) Masterfile to identify and locate any graduates of Canadian schools of medicine (CMGs) working in the United States in direct patient care. We reviewed annual reports of the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS); the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry (CAPER); and the Canadian Collaborative Centre for Physician Resources (C3PR). Beginning in the early 1990s the number of CMGs locating in the U.S. reached an all-time high and then abruptly dropped off in 1995. CMGs are going to the US for post-graduate training in smaller numbers and, are less likely to remain than at any time since the 1970's. This four decade retrospective found considerable variation in the migration pattern of CMGs to the US. CMGs' decision to emigrate to the U.S. may be influenced by both 'push' and 'pull' factors. The relative strength of these factors changed and by 2004, more CMGs were returning from abroad than were leaving and the current outflow is negligible. This study supports the need for medical human resource planning to assume a long-term view taking into account national and international trends to avoid the rapid changes that were observed. These results are of importance to medical resource planning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Unknown 40 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 31%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 3 7%
Professor 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 14%
Social Sciences 5 12%
Computer Science 2 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 75. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2022.
All research outputs
#400,915
of 20,034,281 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#61
of 6,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,852
of 413,743 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#6
of 443 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,034,281 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,676 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 413,743 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 443 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.