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Are persons with fibromyalgia or other musculoskeletal pain more likely to report hearing loss? A HUNT study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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58 Mendeley
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Title
Are persons with fibromyalgia or other musculoskeletal pain more likely to report hearing loss? A HUNT study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-1331-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Magne Stranden, Håvard Solvin, Egil A. Fors, Linn Getz, Anne-S. Helvik

Abstract

Leading theories about the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia focus on central nervous dysregulation or sensitization, which can cause altered perception. There is growing evidence that fibromyalgia involves altered perception not only of pain, but also other sensory stimuli. On this basis, we investigated whether individuals with fibromyalgia are more likely to report subjective loss of hearing, adjusted for audiometrically measured loss of hearing, compared to persons without any musculoskeletal pain disorders. In addition, we studied persons with other musculoskeletal pain than fibromyalgia and persons who did not have any musculoskeletal pain. The study includes 44 494 persons from the second health survey in Nord-Trøndelag (HUNT2) who had undergone audiometry and answered a comprehensive questionnaire that mapped fibromyalgia, musculoskeletal pain at various sites and subjective hearing loss. Respondents with other musculoskeletal pain problems than fibromyalgia were divided into two groups with respectively localized and widespread musculoskeletal pain. Data were analyzed with logistic regression models adjusting for age, education, anxiety, depression and hearing thresholds. In adjusted analysis, individuals with fibromyalgia had increased likelihood to report subjective hearing loss, compared to persons without fibromyalgia or other musculoskeletal pain (OR 4.578, 95% CI 3.622-5.787 and OR 4.523, 95% CI 3.077-6.647 in women and men). Furthermore, people with local and widespread musculoskeletal pain not diagnosed with fibromyalgia, also had increased likelihood to report subjective hearing loss, compared to people with no musculoskeletal pain. This relationship was greater for widespread pain than for localized pain (OR 1.915, 95% CI 1.627-2.255, and 1.796, 95% CI 1.590-2.029, in women and men with local musculoskeletal pain and OR 3.073, 95% CI 2.668-3.539, OR 3.618, 95% CI 3.225-4.058, in women and men with widespread pain, respectively). Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that fibromyalgia is related to a general dysregulation of the central nervous system. The same might also be the case for other local and, in particular, other widespread, musculoskeletal pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Postgraduate 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Master 6 10%
Other 5 9%
Other 14 24%
Unknown 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 29%
Psychology 9 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 14 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,126,525
of 15,771,246 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#224
of 3,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,756
of 389,903 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#29
of 300 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,771,246 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,060 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 389,903 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 300 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.