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What do antenatal care providers understand and do about oral health care during pregnancy: a cross-sectional survey in New South Wales, Australia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
100 Mendeley
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Title
What do antenatal care providers understand and do about oral health care during pregnancy: a cross-sectional survey in New South Wales, Australia
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1163-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ajesh George, Hannah G Dahlen, Jennifer Reath, Shilpi Ajwani, Sameer Bhole, Andrew Korda, Harrison Ng Chok, Charmaine Miranda, Amy Villarosa, Maree Johnson

Abstract

There is mounting evidence to support the lack of awareness among pregnant women about health consequences and long term risks associated with poor oral hygiene during pregnancy. A recognised and important point of influence is their interaction with health professionals, particularly when receiving Antenatal Care. However, there is limited evidence about the perceptions of ANC providers in Australia toward the provision of perinatal oral healthcare. This study was undertaken to explore the knowledge, attitudes and practices of Antenatal Care (ANC) providers in New South Wales (NSW), Australia providing perinatal oral healthcare and to identify barriers to and predictors of their practices in this area. A cross sectional survey was undertaken of ANC providers (general practitioners, obstetricians/gynaecologists and midwives) practising in NSW, Australia. Participants were recruited through their professional organisations via email, postal mail, and networking at conferences. The survey addressed the domains of knowledge, attitude, barriers and practices towards oral healthcare, along with demographics. Data was entered into SPSS software and analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. A total of 393 surveys (17.6% response rate) were completed comprising 124 general practitioners, 74 obstetricians/gynaecologists and 195 midwives. The results showed limited knowledge among ANC providers regarding the impact of poor maternal oral health on pregnancy/infant outcomes. Most (99%) participants agreed that maternal oral health was important yet few were discussing the importance of oral health or advising women to visit a dentist (16.4-21.5%). Further, less than a third felt they had the skills to provide oral health advice during pregnancy. ANC providers who were more knowledgeable about maternal oral health, had training and information in this area and greater experience, were more likely to engage in practices addressing the oral health of pregnant women. The findings suggest that ANC providers in NSW are not focussing on oral health with pregnant women. ANC providers seem willing to discuss oral health if they have appropriate education/training and information in this area. Further research at a national level is required to confirm whether these findings are similar in all Australian states.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 100 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 23%
Student > Bachelor 17 17%
Researcher 6 6%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 5%
Other 17 17%
Unknown 27 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 20%
Computer Science 2 2%
Psychology 2 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 28 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2020.
All research outputs
#5,109,289
of 17,362,547 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,497
of 3,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,771
of 397,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#144
of 305 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,362,547 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,224 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,703 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 305 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.