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Does standing or sitting position of the anesthesiologist in the operating theatre influence sevoflurane exposure during craniotomies?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Anesthesiology, December 2016
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Title
Does standing or sitting position of the anesthesiologist in the operating theatre influence sevoflurane exposure during craniotomies?
Published in
BMC Anesthesiology, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12871-016-0284-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Péter Sárkány, Béla Tankó, Éva Simon, Judit Gál, Béla Fülesdi, Csilla Molnár

Abstract

Exposure of the OR staff to inhalational anesthetics has been proven by numerous investigators, but its potential adverse effect under the present technical circumstances is a debated issue. The aim of the present work was to test whether using a laminar flow air conditioning system exposure of the team to anesthetic gases is different if the anesthetist works in the sitting as compared to the standing position. Sample collectors were placed at the side of the patient and were fixed at two different heights: at 100 cm (modelling sitting position) and 175 cm (modelling standing position), whereas the third collector was placed at the independent corner of the OR. Collected amount of sevoflurane was determined by an independent chemist using gas chromatography. At the height of the sitting position the captured amount of sevoflurane was somewhat higher (median and IQR: 0.55; 0.29-1.73 ppm) than that at the height of standing (0.37; 0.15-0.79 ppm), but this difference did not reach the level of statistical significance. A significantly lower sevoflurane concentration was measured at the indifferent corner of the OR (0.14; 0.058-0.36 ppm, p < 0.001). Open isolation along with the air flow due to the laminar system does not result in higher anesthetic exposure for the sitting anesthetist positioned to the side of the patient. Evaporated amount of sevoflurane is below the accepted threshold limits in both positions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 20%
Researcher 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Professor 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 5 25%
Unknown 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 40%
Chemistry 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 5 25%
Unknown 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2016.
All research outputs
#13,799,492
of 15,640,884 outputs
Outputs from BMC Anesthesiology
#805
of 1,012 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#321,513
of 388,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Anesthesiology
#17
of 22 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.