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Defective oxytocin function: a clue to understanding the cause of autism?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, October 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
102 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Defective oxytocin function: a clue to understanding the cause of autism?
Published in
BMC Medicine, October 2009
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-7-63
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fiorella Gurrieri, Giovanni Neri

Abstract

The autism spectrum disorders are a group of conditions with neurobehavioral impairment affecting approximately 0.6% of children. The clinical presentation is complex and the etiology is largely unknown, although a major role of genetic factors is widely accepted. A number of genetic studies led to the identification of genes and/or copy number variants whose alterations are associated with autism, but no specific factor has been found so far to be responsible for a substantial proportion of cases. Epigenetic modifications may also play a role, as demonstrated by the occurrence of autism in genetic conditions caused by mutations in imprinted genes or regions.The article by Gregory et al. published this month in BMC Medicine, reports on genomic and epigenetic alterations of OXTR, the gene encoding the receptor for oxytocin. The involvement of this gene was suggested by its deletion in an autistic patient. The subsequent analysis of a group of unrelated autistic subjects did not show an OXTR deletion, but rather hypermethylation of the gene promoter, with a reduced mRNA expression.These findings address two major points of the current debate on the etiology and pathogenesis of autism: the role of oxytocin, known to be involved in modeling human behavior, and the possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms. The nature of this epigenetic dysregulation is unknown but, if proved to be true, might explain the failure to identify sequence alterations in a host of candidate genes. Practical implications of these findings may be forthcoming, however not before extension and validation on a larger scale have confirmed their value.See the associated research paper by Gregory et al: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/7/62.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
Brazil 2 2%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 94 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 21%
Researcher 16 16%
Student > Master 11 11%
Professor 11 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Other 25 25%
Unknown 9 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 17%
Psychology 15 15%
Neuroscience 14 14%
Unspecified 4 4%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 15 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2014.
All research outputs
#3,338,564
of 21,334,388 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,792
of 3,127 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,429
of 173,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,334,388 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,127 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 41.4. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,060 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them