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Clostridium difficile colonization and antibiotics response in PolyFermS continuous model mimicking elderly intestinal fermentation

Overview of attention for article published in Gut Pathogens, December 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

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2 tweeters

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Clostridium difficile colonization and antibiotics response in PolyFermS continuous model mimicking elderly intestinal fermentation
Published in
Gut Pathogens, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13099-016-0144-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie Fehlbaum, Christophe Chassard, Sophie Annick Poeker, Muriel Derrien, Candice Fourmestraux, Christophe Lacroix

Abstract

Clostridium difficile (CD), a spore-forming and toxin-producing bacterium, is the main cause for antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the elderly. Here we investigated CD colonization in novel in vitro fermentation models inoculated with immobilized elderly fecal microbiota and the effects of antibiotic treatments. Two continuous intestinal PolyFermS models inoculated with different immobilized elder microbiota were used to investigate selected factors of colonization of CD in proximal (PC, model 1) and transverse-distal (TDC, model 1 and 2) colon conditions. Colonization of two CD strains of different PCR ribotypes, inoculated as vegetative cells (ribotype 001, model 1) or spores (ribotypes 001 and 012, model 2), was tested. Treatments with two antibiotics, ceftriaxone (daily 150 mg L(-1)) known to induce CD infection in vivo or metronidazole (twice daily 333 mg L(-1)) commonly used to treat CD, were investigated in TDC conditions (model 2) for their effects on gut microbiota composition (qPCR, 16S pyrosequencing) and activity (HPLC), CD spore germination and colonization, and cytotoxin titer (Vero cell assay). CD remained undetected after inoculating vegetative cells in PC reactors of model 1, but was shown to colonize TDC reactors of both models, reaching copy numbers of up to log10 8 mL(-1) effluent with stable production of toxin correlating with CD cell numbers. Ceftriaxone treatment in TDC reactors showed only small effects on microbiota composition and activity and did not promote CD colonization compared to antibiotic-free control reactor. In contrast, treatment with metronidazole after colonization of CD induced large modifications in the microbiota and decreased CD numbers below the detection limit of the specific qPCR. However, a fast CD recurrence was measured only 2 days after cessation of metronidazole treatment. Using our in vitro fermentation models, we demonstrated that stable CD colonization in TDC reactors can be induced by inoculating CD vegetative cells or spores without the application of ceftriaxone. Treatment with metronidazole temporarily reduced the counts of CD, in agreement with CD infection recurrence in vivo. Our data demonstrate that CD colonized an undisturbed microbiota in vitro, in contrast to in vivo observations, thus suggesting an important contribution of host-related factors in the protection against CD infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 24%
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Professor 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 26%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Engineering 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 7 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2016.
All research outputs
#5,141,436
of 9,727,899 outputs
Outputs from Gut Pathogens
#126
of 254 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,682
of 315,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gut Pathogens
#9
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,727,899 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 254 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,568 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.